News | Blood Testing | September 08, 2016

Data Presented on New Prevencio Test Panel for Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

Clinical and multi-protein panel found to have better positive predictive value than Framingham Risk Score, as well as exercise and nuclear stress tests

Prevencio, clinical and multi-protein test panel, obstructive coronary artery disease, data presentation, European Society of Cardiology, ESC Congress

September 8, 2016 — Prevencio Inc. announced that data on its new clinical and multi-protein panel to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease was presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress. The data was presented by Principal Investigator James L. Januzzi, M.D., a practicing cardiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. 

Researchers assayed and analyzed blood proteins and clinical variables from the Catheter Sampled Blood Archive in Cardiovascular Disease (CASABLANCA Study).  For this study, 927 subjects with coronary angiography were included, and considered for the presence or absence of >70 percent obstruction in at least one major coronary artery. The data demonstrated high accuracy for the score to predict the presence of significant coronary obstruction. The score had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.87, and had 90 percent positive predictive value (PPV) for a one cut-off score. In an alternative five score model, a score of 5 (very high risk) produced a PPV of 93 percent and a score of 1 (very low risk) produced a negative predictive value (NPV) of 91 percent.

When the new test score, referred to as HART CAD, was compared with available data for the renowned Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the HART CAD produced consistent and superior performance for predicting presence of coronary artery disease (AUC of 0.87 for HART CAD versus 0.52 for FRS). Similarly, when HART CAD was compared with available data for exercise and nuclear stress tests, which are standards of care in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, the HART CAD was substantially more accurate for predicting coronary artery disease (AUC of 0.87 for HART CAD versus 0.52 for stress testing).

"We were pleased to identify a diagnostic score of clinical variables and proteins with excellent accuracy for the diagnosis and exclusion of patients with underlying significant coronary artery disease," said Januzzi.  "It is impressive the panel performed well across multiple groups, including those without prior known coronary artery disease, those presenting without acute myocardial infarct, and notably in women, who represent a diagnostic challenge."

Consistent with its ability to predict presence of significant CAD, the HART CAD panel also predicted risk of future myocardial infarction (also known as MI or heart attack) and, in subjects with an elevated score, there was a shorter time to MI as compared to subjects with a lower score.

The panel's clinical parameters included sex and history of percutaneous coronary intervention, as well as four proteins (adiponectin, apolipoprotein C-1 [Apo C-1], kidney injury molecule-1 [KIM-1], and midkine).  "Taken together, the proteins in our score represent a unique pathophysiologic mix of abnormal glucose and fatty acid metabolism (adiponectin), hyperlipidemia (Apo C-1), renal dysfunction/injury (KIM-1), and vascular injury and plaque infiltration (midkine), and explains why the 'orthogonal' information provided by these proteins added independent value to the clinical variables. We look forward to testing the HART CAD score in patients with different pre-test probabilities and hopefully bringing a new, non-invasive test to the millions of patients who need improved diagnosis for coronary artery disease," said Januzzi.

Interest in coronary artery disease is driven largely by the fact that the disease is a major public health concern. It is a leading cause of death in the U.S., affecting nearly 20 percent of people ages 65 and older.  Current coronary artery disease testing modalities, including stress testing and cardiac computed tomography (CT) have limitations, including variable accuracy, limitations in obese and female patients, and need for ionizing radiation with adjunctive imaging for stress testing, as well as ionizing radiation, limited availability and high costs for cardiac CT.  Moreover, up to 50 percent of patients are needlessly referred for invasive coronary catheterization, subjecting them to additional ionizing radiation and complications including death. As such, a non-invasive, low-cost, and safe test would be valuable and potentially result in reduction of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

For more information: www.prevenciomed.com

Related Content

CorInnova Awarded 2017 InnoSTARS Prize for EpicHeart Soft Robotic Heart Assist Device
News | Artificial Heart| December 11, 2017
CorInnova Inc. recently announced it was awarded second prize in the “2017 InnoSTARS” life science competition for its...
ECG Study of NBA Players Shows Need for Sport-Specific Normative Data and Guidelines
News | ECG| December 08, 2017
Cardiologists at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center compared electrocardiographic findings...
New Study Suggests Protein Could Protect Against Coronary Artery Disease

Patients with no obstructed blood flow in the coronary arteries had higher levels of CXCL5 (blue) compared to patients with moderate levels (green) or lower levels (yellow) of CXCL5, who had increased severity of coronary obstructions (indicated by the arrows). Credit: Schisler lab

News | Cardiac Diagnostics| December 07, 2017
December 7, 2017 — The buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries is an unfortunate part of aging.
Edwards Acquires Harpoon Medical
News | Heart Valve Technology| December 07, 2017
December 7, 2017 — Edwards Lifesciences Corp.
Robocath Receives $1.5 Million in Capital for Advancement of R-One Robotic System
News | Robotic Systems| December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — French company Robocath, which designs and develops...
New data on the Corvia intra-atrial shunt to treat diastolic heart failure were presented at the recent 2017 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions. It was the most popular story in November.

New data on the Corvia intra-atrial shunt to treat diastolic heart failure were presented at the recent 2017 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions. It was the most popular story in November.

Feature | December 06, 2017 | Dave Fornell
Here is the list of the most popular articles and videos on the Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) magaz
E-cigarettes Most Likely to be Used by Alcohol Drinkers and Former Cigarette Smokers, at American Heart Association (AHA), #AHA2017.
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — Electronic cigarettes are more frequently used by people who recently quit smoking and alcohol dri
Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart failure and heart attack. American Heart Association (AHA), #AHA2017
News | Womens Healthcare| December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problem
Lack of sleep may cause heart disease in older women. American heart Association, #AHA2017
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| December 06, 2017
December 6, 2017 — Older women who do not get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, accor
New Tool Predicts Risk of Heart Attack in Older Surgery Patients
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| December 05, 2017
A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery...
Overlay Init