News | August 18, 2014

First Varicose Vein Patient Treated With FDA-approved Polidocanol Injectable Foam

Polidocanol injectable foam 1 percent is now available in the United States

 Polidocanol injectable foam Varithena Varicose Veins

August 18, 2014 — Polidocanol injectable foam (Varithena), the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved foam for the treatment of incompetent great saphenous veins (GSV), accessory saphenous veins and visible varicosities of the GSV system both above and below the knee.

Polidocanol injectable foam improves symptoms related to or caused by varicose veins, and the appearance of varicose veins, and is proven to reduce the five symptoms patients consider most important — heaviness, achiness, swelling, throbbing, itching (HASTI symptoms).

Marlin Schul, M.D., M.B.A., of the Lafayette Regional Vein & Laser Center in Indiana, who conducted the first Polidocanol injectable foam procedure, said, "I am proud to now be able to offer Varithena as a new treatment option for my patients with varicose veins. Varithena is a convenient, minimally invasive treatment and patients can return to normal activities shortly after treatment."

Paul McCubbin, head of Varithenaat BTG, commented, "Varithena is the first and only FDA-approved comprehensive treatment that improves the symptoms and appearance of varicose veins. We are delighted that this clinically proven product is now commercially available to qualified physicians."

Polidocanol injectable foam is a uniform, low-nitrogen, polidocanol microfoam, dispensed from a proprietary canister device. The physician injects a small amount of polidocanol injectable foam into the malfunctioning vein through a small tube (catheter) or a needle. It displaces the blood from the vein to reach and treat the vein wall; the diseased vein collapses and blood flow is diverted to healthy veins nearby.

For more information: www.varithena.com

Related Content

A patient case study showing a venous ulcer formation 18 months following thermal ablation varicose vein treatment in the GSV. The patient was treated with Varithena polidocanol endovenous microfoam chemical-ablation. Images show baseline prior to treatment (right), followed by one, four and six weeks after treatment. The treatment is also called sclerotherapy.

A patient case study showing a venous ulcer formation 18 months following thermal ablation varicose vein treatment in the GSV. The patient was treated with Varithena polidocanol endovenous microfoam chemical-ablation. Images show baseline prior to treatment (right), followed by one, four and six weeks after treatment.

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