News | August 10, 2008

Flexible Stenting Solutions Completes First Human Study of New Peripheral Arterial Stent

August 11, 2008 - Flexible Stenting Solutions Inc. said today a physician at Auckland City Hospital in New Zealand successfully implanted several of its third generation arterial stents for the treatment of peripheral vascular lesions involving the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries.

Patients with lesion lengths up to 100 mm and fully occluded lesions were included in the study.

This first-in-man clinical trial using a full range of stent sizes, including 120 mm, was performed by Associate Professor Andrew Holden who is the director of interventional radiology at Auckland City Hospital, and the principal investigator.

“The flexible stent handled both stenoses and occlusions in the femoro-popliteal artery segment as well as I had hoped with excellent immediate appearances following deployment” Holden said. “Overall, I felt the stent and delivery system performed very well in the acute phase and I await the longer term follow up in these patients with great interest.”

Flexible Stenting Solutions has developed a novel, self-expanding stent technology to provide a wide range of vascular and non-vascular therapies. The treatment of femoro-popliteal disease is the first vascular application of Flexible Stenting Solutions’ technology.

While stent procedures have become widespread in the treatment of coronary arterial disease, their use in the more challenging peripheral vascular disease setting had been limited in the last several years by inadequate stent design, the company said. The fully connected SFA/Pop flexible stent has coupled technology with clinical needs by reportedly providing a highly durable and fatigue resistant stent with superior radial stiffness and low chronic outward force.

For more information: www.flexiblestent.com

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