News | June 03, 2021

GE Healthcare and the ACC Join Forces to Advance AI in Cardiac Care

GE Healthcare had integrated artificial intelligence algorithms into many of its device technologies. Recently the vendor introduced AI-enabled real-time automated ejection fraction measurements on its Venue Go point of care ultrasound system.

GE Healthcare had integrated artificial intelligence algorithms into many of its device technologies. Recently the vendor introduced AI-enabled real-time automated ejection fraction measurements on its Venue Go point of care ultrasound system

June 3, 2020 — GE Healthcare is collaborating with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) through support of and participation in the ACC’s Applied Health Innovation Consortium for the purpose of building a roadmap for artificial intelligence (AI) and digital technology in cardiology and developing new strategies for improved health outcomes.

The consortium brings together academic, clinical, industry and technology partners and patient advocates, to collaborate in the digital transformation of healthcare and achieve trust in the development of clinical evidence and guidance. GE Healthcare will lend its unique perspective as a leading global medical technology and digital solutions innovator in connected cardiovascular care to this forum. GE Healthcare’s Edison platform forms the technological basis for the company’s many AI offerings that are an integral part of its advanced cardiac technology used by clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of more than 145 million hearts each year.

The thought leadership of the ACC, the clinical depth of the Consortium’s academic and technology  partners and the product development muscle of GE Healthcare is expected to constitute a virtuous circle from defining impactful challenges, developing AI models, and putting research results to practice through implementation in disruptive clinical workflows.

“We are excited to have GE Healthcare join forces with the Applied Health Innovation Consortium,” said John Rumsfeld, M.D., Ph.D., FACC, ACC chief innovation officer and chief science and quality officer. “In our mission to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health, GE Healthcare is a great collaborator to help build a roadmap for AI and digital technology that bridges gaps in clinical care.”

As the world adapts to the challenges presented by self-isolation, reduction in hands-on medical care, and a variety of unknowns, three main drivers of the digital transformation that will impact care are a migration towards virtual care, increased remote monitoring of patients via wearables and telemedicine, and AI-driven care, including image interpretation, risk prediction, and improved care decision-making. The Consortium intends to be a catalyst in identifying priorities and making progress in specific and practical ways to impact clinical care.

“We are excited to help shape the heart care pathway – from early detection to treatment to follow-up at home – by combining our expertise in AI and digital technologies with top clinical leadership to advance risk prediction and decision-making support,” said Eigil Samset, chief technology scientist for cardiology solutions at GE Healthcare. “Ultimately, this will enable precision health, which is doing the right thing, at the right time for every patient, at scale – with the ultimate goal to provide better outcomes, delivered to more people, more cost efficiently.”

The collaboration will start tackling the overwhelming challenges related to atrial fibrillation management along with other care pathways in cardiology that are top of mind, including coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease and heart failure.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

 

Related Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

Artificial Intelligence Applications in Cardiology

Vendors and ACC Collaborate With Consumer Technology Association to Help Clinicians and Patients Understand Cardiovascular Devices

Applications for Artificial Intelligence in Cardiovascular Imaging

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

 

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