News | November 17, 2010

Lunch Symposium to Highlight Medical Simulation Technology

November 17, 2010 – A lunch symposium detailing the evidence for simulation in medical training and other fields will be sponsored by W.L. Gore and Associates at the VEITHsymposium. The EVEResT (European Virtual Reality Endovascular Research Team) lunch symposium will take place Nov. 19 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. in the Gramercy A room, second floor.

Companies will demonstrate how new simulation technologies are designed to enhance performance in endovascular procedures.

Rapid advances in technology and a demand for increased patient safety have led to a growing interest in simulation as a training tool for complex procedures. As a result, some of the world’s leading vascular surgeons and radiologists are participating in the event.

It is chaired by Nicholas Cheshire, M.D., professor of vascular surgery, head of circulation sciences and renal medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Campus St. Mary’s Hospital, London; Mario Lachat, M.D., head of cardiovascular surgery, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; and Isabelle van Herzeele, M.D., Ph.D, consultant at the department of thoracic and vascular surgery at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium and Honorary Fellow at the department of biosurgery and surgical technology NHS Trust, Campus St. Mary's Hospital, London.

The group was founded involving three academic centers and the three specialties (cardiology, radiology, vascular surgery) involved in endovascular treatments of vascular diseases. This collaboration is intended to inspire other academic centers, professional societies and medical device companies to work together and develop a standardized approach for endovascular training and assessment.

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