News | Venous Therapies | January 26, 2018

Medtronic Launches IDE Study of Abre Venous Self-Expanding Stent

Study to enroll subjects with deep venous disease at up to 35 sites across the U.S. and Europe

Medtronic Launches IDE Study of Abre Venous Self-Expanding Stent

January 26, 2018 – Medtronic plc announced the initiation of its investigational device exemption (IDE) study for the Abre venous self-expanding stent system. The ABRE IDE Study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Abre stent in subjects with iliofemoral venous outflow obstruction. The first procedure was performed in December of 2017, by Erin Murphy, M.D., director of the venous and lymphatic program at Carolinas HealthCare System’s Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute in Charlotte, N.C., and national principal investigator for the ABRE IDE Study in the United States.

The multi-center, single-arm study intends to enroll 200 subjects with deep venous disease from up to 35 sites throughout the U.S. and Europe. The primary efficacy endpoint will evaluate patency at 12 months, which is defined by freedom from occlusion and freedom from clinically-driven target lesion revascularization (CD-TLR). The primary safety endpoint will evaluate the incidence of composite major adverse events (MAE) at 30 days following stenting of an obstruction in the iliofemoral venous segment. Data from the study will be used to support the Abre stent U.S. pre-market approval (PMA) application for the treatment of symptomatic iliofemoral venous outflow obstruction in patients with venous occlusive disease.

“The launch of the ABRE IDE Study marks the beginning of an important journey to establish new options for the treatment of deep venous disease," said Murphy. The first procedure was performed at Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute on a patient with nonthrombotic iliac vein lesion (NIVL) who is doing well post-treatment. We are excited to continue enrollment at our sites throughout the U.S. and Europe.”

Medtronic estimates deep venous obstruction affects more than 24 million individuals worldwide. Deep venous obstruction occurs when veins in the deep venous system become compressed and restrict blood flow. It can result in discomfort and pain, limit a patient’s mobility, and impair quality of life.

The Abre stent is an investigational device in the U.S. intended for permanent implant in the iliofemoral vein. It is pre-mounted on a 9 French delivery system and features a nitinol stent with a tri-axial shaft design. The stent utilizes an open-cell design with three connection points between the cells that are intended to enable flexibility and conformability. Upon deployment, the Abre stent uses an optimized balance of strength and flexibility to exert an outward force and open the vein.

“Deep venous disease can cause pain, swelling, and blood clots, which can potentially be devastating to patients,” said Stephen Black, M.D., consultant vascular surgeon, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital, London and European principal investigator for the ABRE IDE Study. “As a result, there is a critical need for treatment options that are safe, effective, and durable. We look forward to using the Abre stent in the restoration of patency in patients with deep venous disease.”

In the U.S., Abre is an investigational device and not yet approved for commercial use. Abre received CE (Conformité Européene) Mark approval in April of 2017 and is intended for use in the iliofemoral veins for treatment of symptomatic venous outflow obstruction.

For more information: www.medtronic.com

 

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