News | Heart Failure | May 16, 2016

New Radar Technology May Reduce Heart Failure Re-Hospitalization

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation selected to test product that detects worsening heart failure before patient notices symptoms

May 16, 2016 –To work towards a better method of diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF), Peter Eckman, M.D., with the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (MHIF) is an investigator leading the SMILE (Sensible Medical Innovations Lung fLuid status monitor allows rEducing readmission rate of heart failure patients) study at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis. This study will involve the use of the SensiVest, a product developed by Sensible Medical Innovations, headquartered in Israel. SensiVest is comprised of a wearable vest, with two embedded sensors, and a bedside console.

Patients with CHF are at risk of re-hospitalization when fluid builds up in their lungs. By the time symptoms such as shortness of breath or increased fatigue are present, the fluid build-up often requires medical intervention. This is stressful for the patient, and it’s also costly; the annual cost for CHF treatment in the United States is $30 billion, with half of that going toward hospitalization.

In this study, SensiVest is worn by CHF patients once a day, for a 90-second measurement, to measure the amount of fluid in their lungs. The results are provided to their physician via a secured Web portal. There is no surgery involved, nor does the patient need to visit a clinic or hospital to obtain readings. The physician can review the results and take proactive measures, such as changing medications or dosages, before the patient develops symptoms.

Eckman noted, “Using non-invasive technology to detect fluid buildup in heart failure patients improves our ability to direct treatment before a problem arises, and may reduce risk of re-hospitalization, which is good for the patient and can reduce healthcare costs. We are excited to be part of this type of innovative work.”

A study initially conducted in Israel reported that hospital readmission rates were reduced by 87 percent for patients who were part of the study. Sensible Medical Innovations selected the MHIF as one of 15 sites currently testing the SensiVest in the United States, with plans to expand the study to more hospitals in the future.

For more information: www.sensible-medical.com

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