News | CT Angiography (CTA) | February 14, 2017

NICE Guidance Recommends HeartFlow FFRct Analysis for Patients With Stable Chest Pain

U.K. committee concludes technology is safe, highly accurate and cost-effective solution for non-invasive evaluation

HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, NICE guidance, U.K., United Kingdom, guidelines, stable chest pain

February 14, 2017 — The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom recently issued guidance for use of the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis to help determine the cause of stable chest pain in patients. Developed by HeartFlow Inc., the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis is the first non-invasive technology to provide insight into both the extent of coronary artery disease and the impact that disease has on blood flow to the heart, enabling clinicians to select an appropriate treatment.

NICE recommends the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis for patients with stable recent onset chest pain. Based on the evidence, it concluded the technology is safe, has a high level of diagnostic accuracy and may avoid the need for invasive coronary angiography. The committee further concluded that, when compared to all other tests, use of the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis could save the U.K. National Health Service approximately £214 per patient through avoiding unnecessary invasive tests and treatment.

The new guidance follows chest pain guidelines issued by NICE in November 2016, recommending non-invasive coronary CT angiography (cCTA) as the initial diagnostic test for patients with stable chest pain. NICE now recommends the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis as the most cost-effective option when additional information is needed by the clinician.

HeartFlow’s process starts with data from a standard, non-invasive cCTA. Leveraging deep learning, an advanced form of artificial intelligence, HeartFlow creates a personalized, 3-D model of each patient’s arteries. Powerful computer algorithms then solve millions of complex equations to simulate blood flow and assess the impact of blockages in the arteries. With this actionable information, physicians can determine the right course of action for each patient.

“The HeartFlow FFRct Analysis provides a definitive understanding of both the anatomical and functional findings, without any additional testing or risk for patients,” said Joseph Mills, M.D., Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital. “Application of the Heartflow FFRct Analysis is likely to transform the quality of care we can provide for patients, ensuring the most accurate diagnosis and the best treatment plan, as well reducing the need for invasive coronary angiography – a procedure not without its risks.”

Read the article “Clinical Applications of FFR-CT.”

VIDEO: Early U.S. Experience With FFR-CT in Evaluating ED Chest Pain Presentation

Read the article “One-Year PLATFORM Trial Results Reinforce Benefits of FFR-CT.”

Related Content

HeartFlow Planner Changes Treatment Strategy for Coronary Heart Disease Patients
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | May 28, 2019
New data demonstrated that use of the investigational HeartFlow Planner, a real-time, non-invasive interactive planning...
Siemens Somatom Force 64-slice, dual-source computed tomography (CT) system installed at the Baylor Scott & White Health Heart And Vascular Hospital.
360 Photos | CT Angiography (CTA) | May 20, 2019
This is a 360 degree photo of a Siemens Somatom Force 64-slice, dual-source computed tomography (CT) system installed
An example of a cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) perfusion exam showing iodine contrast mapping in the myocardium, which is used as a surrogate for blood perfusion.

An example of a cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) perfusion exam showing iodine contrast mapping in the myocardium, which is used as a surrogate for blood perfusion.

Podcast | CT Angiography (CTA) | May 03, 2019
A discussion with Gianluc...
How to reduce radiation dose in cardiac CT.
Feature | CT Angiography (CTA) | April 01, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
April 1, 2019 — Here is a checklist of dose-sparing practices for coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) ima
CT Offers Non-Invasive Alternative for Complex Coronary Disease Treatment Planning based on data from the SYNTAX III Trial. The use of FFR-CT in the trial showed better planning for interventional procedures.

CT cffers a non-invasive alternative for complex coronary disease treatment planning based on data from the SYNTAX III Trial. 

News | CT Angiography (CTA) | October 16, 2018
A new study published in the European Heart Journal shows computed tomography (CT) can be a useful aid in heart team...
A comparison of CT image of heavily calcified coronary arteries that appear to present a significant hemodynamic blockages and the correspending FFR-CT showing the patient had adequate blood flow and does not need a diagnostic angiogram or intervention.

A comparison of a CT image of heavily calcified coronary arteries that appear to present a significant hemodynamic blockage and the corresponding FFR-CT showing the patient had adequate blood flow and does not need a diagnostic angiogram or intervention. Image courtesy of Kavitha Chinnaiyan, William Beaumont Hospital.

Feature | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 23, 2018 | Dave Fornell, Editor
The use of non-invasive fractional flow reserve CT (FFR-CT) was the hottest topic discussed at the...
Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 19, 2018
Kavitha Chinnaiyan, M.D., FACC, FSCCT, associate professor, Oakland University, William Beaumont School of Medicine,
Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 17, 2018
A discussion with Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, FSCCT, director of cardiovascular research and cardiac CT programs
Overlay Init