News | August 15, 2014

NIH Launches 3-D Print Exchange for Researchers, Students

Public website promotes health and science applications of 3-D printing

A 3-D printed model.

August 15, 2014 — The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3-D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download and edit 3-D print files related to health and science. These files can be used, for example, to print custom laboratory equipment and models of bacteria and human anatomy.

“3-D printing is a potential game changer for medical research,” said NIH director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “At NIH, we have seen an incredible return on investment; pennies’ worth of plastic have helped investigators address important scientific questions while saving time and money. We hope that the 3D Print Exchange will expand interest and participation in this new and exciting field among scientists, educators and students.”

NIH uses 3-D printing, or the creation of a physical object from a digital model, to study viruses, repair and enhance lab apparatus, and help plan medical procedures. The 3-D Print Exchange makes these types of files freely available, along with video tutorials for new users and a discussion forum to promote collaboration. The site also features tools that convert scientific and clinical data into ready-to-print 3-D files.

The 3-D Print Exchange is a collaborative effort led by NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). “3-D printing is helping to advance science at NIAID and beyond,” said NIAID director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “The ability to design and print tangible models of pathogens, for example, can give researchers a fresh perspective on the diseases they study and open new and promising lines of investigation.”

Additional support is provided by other NIH components, including the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Library of Medicine. The 3-D Print Exchange is funded in part by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through its Ignite and Ventures programs, which help support innovation within the agency.

For more information: www.nih.gov

Related Content

Canon Medical Receives FDA Clearance for AiCE Reconstruction Technology for CT
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 18, 2019
Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. has received 510(k) clearance on its new deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) image...
SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients

Jonathon Leipsic, M.D., (left) and Gilbert Raff, M.D., (right)

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 05, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present the 2019 Gold Medal Award to Jonathon Leipsic, M....
Johns Hopkins Medicine First in U.S. to Install Canon Medical's Aquilion Precision
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 26, 2019
Johns Hopkins Medicine now has access to the first Ultra-High Resolution computed tomography (UHR CT) system for...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts Cardiovascular Edition of Somatom go.Top CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 14, 2019
Siemens Healthineers will introduce the Somatom go.Top Cardiovascular Edition, a new version of its established...
Canon Medical Introduces Deep Learning-Based CT Image Reconstruction
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 27, 2019
Canon Medical Systems recently introduced AiCE (Advanced intelligent Clear IQ Engine), a deep convolutional neural...
SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has released a new expert consensus document for computed...
A CT calcium scoring image showing calcified plaques in coronary vessel segments. The higher the calcium content of the vessels, the high risk the patient is for a heart attack event. CAC exam

A CT calcium scoring image showing calcified plaques in coronary vessel segments. The higher the calcium content of the vessels, the higher risk the patient is for a heart attack event. Image courtesy of Canon Medical Systems.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 17, 2018 | Dave Fornell, Editor
A picture is worth a thousand words, and to patients concerned about their health, detailed images of the coronary an
Abdominal Aortic Calcification May Signal Future Heart Attack

Image from computed tomography (CT) colonography shows segmented abdominal aortic calcification measured with semiautomated CT tool on coronal image. Within region of interest over aorta selected by user, tool automatically segments and quantifies aortic calcification (shown in blue). 

Image Credit: O’Connor S D, Graffy P M, Zea R, et al. Does nonenhanced CT-based quantification of abdominal aortic calcification outperform the Framingham Risk Score in predicting cardiovascular event sin asymptomatic adults? Radiology doi: 10.1148/radiol.2018180562. Published online Oct. 2, 2018. © RSNA.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 12, 2018
Computed tomography (CT)-based measures of calcification in the abdominal aorta are strong predictors of heart attacks...
Overlay Init