News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | June 03, 2016

ONC Survey Shows Electronic Health Record Adoption at 96 Percent

Data from 2015 show utilization increased nearly 25 percent in four years

ONC, survey, electronic health records, adoption, 2015

June 3, 2016 — According to data from a new survey, nearly all of the nation’s hospitals have adopted certified electronic health records (EHRs). The survey was released at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology’s (ONC) 2016 annual meeting, May 31-June 2 in Washington, D.C.

The new data represents a nine-fold increase since 2008, according to survey data from the American Hospital Association (AHA) Information Technology Supplement. The data also show there have been increases in sharing health data among hospitals, with over 85 percent of hospitals sending key clinical information electronically.

The annual meeting convened key stakeholders across the public and private sector to discuss the collective work to advance the seamless and secure flow of health information for a number of national priorities. This includes advancing delivery system reform and improving health and facilitates science and research, such as through the Precision Medicine Initiative.

“As we kick off the 2016 ONC Annual Meeting today, these data showing nearly universal adoption of certified electronic health records by U.S. hospitals are an indication of how far we have come for clinicians and individuals since the HITECH Act was passed,” said National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Karen DeSalvo, M.D., MPH, M.Sc.

The ONC data briefs show the adoption rate of certified EHRs has increased from almost 72 percent in 2011 (when this information began to be collected) to 96 percent in 2015. While the overall rate for the use of certified health information technology (IT) has remained stable, the new data show that adoption rates for small, rural and critical access hospitals increased. 

The AHA data also show that:

  • The percentage of hospitals sending, receiving and finding key clinical information grew between 2014 and 2015;
  • In 2015, about half of hospitals had health information electronically available from providers outside their systems. This grew by five percent from 2014; and
  • About half of hospitals report they often or sometimes use patient information they receive electronically from providers outside their systems.

For more information: www.healthit.gov

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