News | April 22, 2011

Society of Interventional Radiology Addresses Radiation Safety, Advances Best Practices

April 22, 2011 – The Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) has a long-term commitment to radiation safety, taking a leading role in measuring and assessing radiation dosage; developing educational programs on radiation safety, radiation protection and reduction of skin dosage; and promoting the safety of patients and health care professionals. Four articles, published this month in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, explore opportunities to improve patient safety through lower dosages and even new equipment that protects both patients and the diagnostic and interventional radiologist.

"The Society of Interventional Radiology views patient care and safety for patients and healthcare professionals among its absolute top priorities. To this end, SIR continually encourages clear communications between informed doctors and patients to recognize risks and benefits of radiation in diagnosis and treatment to save lives," stated SIR President Timothy P. Murphy, M.D., FSIR. "Interventional radiologists pioneered the procedures and standards for safely providing minimally invasive medicine. Patient safety is always incorporated into interventional radiology advances and treatments because interventional radiologists are highly trained in radiation safety, radiation physics, and the biologic effects of radiation and injury protection."

Murphy is an interventional radiologist and director of the Vascular Disease Research Center at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence. "The articles' unifying element is patient safety," said JVIR editor-in-chief Ziv J Haskal, M.D., FSIR. "By lowering a patient's exposure to damaging radiation—without compromising the treatment or diagnostic ability—and developing tools that provide improved functionality and protective properties for use by both the diagnostic and interventional radiologist, interventional radiologists again show why they are the driving force behind the development and implementation of the field's best practices,"

Haskal is also professor of radiology and surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and vice chair of strategic development and chief of vascular and interventional radiology, image-guided therapy and interventional oncology at the University of Maryland Medical Center, both in Baltimore.

"Exploring ways to promote and practice safe radiation procedures and minimize radiation damage caused by medical imaging and image-guided treatments is of paramount concern to SIR members," said Murphy. The four new articles report on safety studies and examine new techniques in imaging used for diagnosis and treatment. The topics range from ways to optimize radiation dosages during fluoroscopic procedures, an examination of an ultra low-dose protocol for CT-guided lung biopsies, a comparison of a suspended protection system versus standard lead apron used by interventional and diagnostic radiologists, and an exploration of dosage differences during conventional CT guidance and a new cone-beam CT-guidance technique.

In "Optimizing Radiation Use During Fluoroscopic Procedures: Proceedings From a Multidisciplinary Consensus Panel," co-author James R. Duncan, M.D., Ph.D., Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo., noted that while fluoroscopic procedures have dramatically improved patient care and outcomes, the rapid rise in the use of ionizing radiation has renewed concerns about exposure during medical imaging. The SIR Foundation initiated a call for a multidisciplinary consensus panel on radiation use in 2010. The article spells out the panel's findings that in both diagnostic and interventional radiology the goal should be optimization during exposure—a strategy that recognizes the need to balance the risks versus the benefits of ionizing radiation.

The panel recommended the development of a registry to capture and analyze data from fluoroscopic procedures, recognizing the need for long-term support from both patient advocacy groups and federal agencies. Jason C. Smith, M.D., Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, Calif., and his co-authors hypothesized in "Ultra-low-dose Protocol for CT-guided Lung Biopsies" that successful results could still be achieved during lung biopsies by radically lowering the CT dose. The study's conclusion proved that with an ultra-low-dose, or ULD protocol, the dose to the chest during CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies is reduced greater than 95 percent from the standard protocol without decreasing technical success or compromising patient safety.

Daniel A. Marichal, M.D., Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, and his colleagues evaluated the characteristics, reliability and ease of use of two radiation protection systems in "Comparison of a Suspended Radiation Protection System Versus Standard Lead Apron for Radiation Exposure of a Simulated Interventionalist." The group examined the effectiveness of a suspended radiation protection system that offers protection from the top of the head to the calves using a complex overhead motion system that eliminates weight on the operator and allows range of motion. When compared to the standard lead apron and tested on a mock interventionalist in a simulated clinical setting, the system greatly reduced exposures to many body areas.

A group of Dutch interventionalists, led by Sicco J. Braak, M.D., St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands, learned that using a recently developed needle intervention technique called cone-beam CT-guidance (CBCT) was effective and resulted in a considerably reduced dosage for patients when compared with traditional CT-guidance. Their results are presented in "Effective Dose During Needle Interventions: Cone-beam CT-guidance Compared With Conventional CT-guidance."

For more information: www.SIRweb.org

Related Content

Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 25, 2018
A discussion with Patricia Dickson, LRT(CT), director of imaging and outpatient services, Capital Cardiology Associat
Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 23, 2018
Ed Nicol, M.D., FSCCT, MBA, head of cardiac CT, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and chair of the Society of Cardiova
Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 17, 2018
An interview with Patrick Serruys, M.D., Ph.D., Imperial College London, principal investigator of the SYNTAX III Tri
Zebra Medical Vision Announces FDA 510(k) Clearance of Coronary Calcium Algorithm
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 12, 2018
Zebra Medical Vision has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Coronary...
IAC Awards First CT Accreditation for a Mobile Stroke Unit
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 09, 2018
The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) recently recognized the University of Tennessee Health Science Center...
FFR-CT may soon replace invasive angiography for coronary lesion assessment. #EuroPCR 

Anexample of a clinical case of CT-FFR, which can derive the FFR numbers for their entire coronary tree using a noninvasive CT scan.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 29, 2018
May 29, 2018 — Results from the innovative SYNTAX III Revolution Trial [1] underline the effectiveness of evolving no
James Min Named Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 01, 2018
James K. Min, M.D., FSCCT, has been selected for a five-year term as the new editor-in-chief of the Journal of...
FDA Clears Siemens' Somatom go.All, go.Top CT Scanners
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 18, 2018
April 18, 2018 — The U.S.
Canon Medical Systems' Aquilion Precision CT Receives FDA Clearance
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 13, 2018
Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. this week received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for the Aquilion...
FDA Clears Siemens Somatom Edge Plus CT System
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 04, 2018
April 4, 2018 — The U.S.
Overlay Init