News | June 10, 2009

TUG Procedure Can Reduce or Eliminate Need for X-Rays in the Cath Lab

June 10, 2009 - Interventional cardiac catheterization procedures are one of the most effective treatments for peripheral vascular disease (PVD), but the procedures are not an option for millions with PVD who also have kidney problems or allergies to the contrast dye used during the procedures.

As a possible new option for these patients, Tony Das, M.D., an interventional cardiologist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, recently demonstrated a unique procedure that clears femoral artery blockages without the use of contrast dye or X-ray radiation.

"We're always looking for new and innovative ways to better care for patients with this debilitating condition," Dr. Das said. "This procedure could one day be something we offer people who are not suitable candidates for other interventional procedures."

Called TUG (transcutaneous ultrasound guided vascular intervention), the procedure involves using an ultrasound device on top of the patient's skin to produce images of the arteries to navigate the guide wire and stent the artery.

"With the prevalence of diabetes and obesity among an already aging population, the challenges facing those involved in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular disease increase by the minute," Dr. Das said. "It's a problem that will increasingly challenge medical experts around the country in coming years."

PVD is a common condition affecting more than 10 million adults in the United States. The condition is a disease of blood vessels outside the heart and brain characterized by a narrowing of vessels that carry blood to the legs, arms, stomach and kidneys. The condition causes lower-leg tissue damage, non-healing wounds, blood clots and limb loss.

"Currently, PVD patients with kidney problems or allergies to contrast dye can only be treated with medications or open surgery, which carries a higher risk for complications," said Jon Gardner, administrative director of the heart and vascular service line at Texas Health Dallas. "Innovative new procedures like Dr. Das' technique could provide hope to these patients."

For more information: www.texashealth.org/

Related Content

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis
News | Cardiac Imaging| August 18, 2017
August 18, 2017 — The American Society of...
Houston Methodist Hospital Enters Multi-Year Technology and Research Agreement With Siemens Healthineers
News | Cardiac Imaging| August 17, 2017
Houston Methodist Hospital and Siemens Healthineers have entered into a multi-year agreement to bring cutting-edge...
Bivalirudin exhibited an improvement in 30-day all-cause mortality when injected post PCI.
News | Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies| August 16, 2017
August 16, 2017 — A study has examined the efficacies of various post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) bivali
CMS considers eliminating cardiac bundled payments.
Feature | Business| August 16, 2017 | Dave Fornell
August 16, 2017 — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a proposed rule to reduce the number
News | Drug-Eluting Balloons| August 15, 2017
Surmodics Inc. announced receipt of an investigational device exemption (IDE) from the U.S. Food and Drug...
The Vascular Dynamics MobiusHD device enhances the carotid baroreceptors to reduce resistant hypertension.
News | Hypertension| August 15, 2017
Aug. 15, 2017 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Vascular Dynamics Inc.
CDN to Integrate Advanced Cardiac Imaging Tools From DiA Imaging Analysis
Technology | August 10, 2017
August 10, 2017 — CDN recently announced a new partnership agreement with DiA Imaging Analysis Ltd., makers of next-g
Four Blue Cross Blue Shield Companies Issue Positive Medical Policies on HeartFlow FFRct Analysis
News | FFR Catheters| August 09, 2017
HeartFlow Inc. announced that four Blue Cross Blue Shield companies have each issued a positive medical policy for the...
Overlay Init