Videos | March 28, 2019

VIDEO: The Role of the NCDR in Boosting Cardiology Quality Improvement

Interview with Frederick Masoudi, M.D., FACC, FAHA, professor of cardiology at the University of Colorado Hospital, and a physician leader of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR). The NCDR is the American College of Cardiology's suite of cardiovascular data registries helping hospitals and private practices measure and improve the quality of care they provide.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

Recent Videos View all 451 items

Medical 3-D Printing | May 21, 2019

This is a sample of the 3-D printed hearts and coronary anatomy models created from patient CT scans to enable anatomical assessment, device sizing and plan which devices to use and navigation for complex structural heart cases at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. These hearts are in the office of Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, at Henry Ford. She is in charge of a robust 3-D printing program to aid the structural heart program, which surpassed its 1,000th patient printed heart earlier in 2019. 

 

Realted Content With Wang:

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer Aided Design

VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

Cath Lab | May 20, 2019

This is a walk through of the primary structural heart hybrid cath lab at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Mich. It is the hospital's newest lab and is centered around a Philips Azurion angiography system, which is a low dose imaging system that significantly reduces dose exposure compared to previous generation systems. As seen in the video, the lab is also equipped with a vascular access ultrasound system, transesophageal echo (TEE) system, an Abiomed Impella console, a large number of storage cabinets, surgical lighting for cases that convert over to open surgery or for transapical TAVR access, movable radiation shielding and ample space to accommodate surgical equipment and extra staff involved in structural heart procedures. There also is an electrosurgical cutter unit in the lab, which Henry Ford operators use to perform transcaval access TAVR procedures for patients who have anatomical challenges to the femoral access route. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program

 

Find more Henry Ford videos and news.

 

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how the heart's left atrial appendage (LAA) can be evaluated for thrombus and possible transcatheter occlusion using a new cardiac ultrasound lighting technology called TrueVue. It is a movable virtual light source that can interact with the echocardiography images to show photorealistic, virtual surgical views of the cardiac anatomy. The light source can be moved anywhere in the image, including behind structures to backlight them. The technology is offered on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound system. It was shown for the first time in the U.S. at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting.

See another VIDEO example of the photo-realistic lighting technology showing a transcatheter ASD closure with two Amplatzer occluders.

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

University of Colorado Hospital | May 09, 2019

Interview with John Carroll, M.D., director of interventional cardiology, Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, and James Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the 3-D imaging lab at the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital. They discuss how the structural heart program was created and how they invested in advanced imaging to grew into one of the most advanced programs in the country. They explain how the program now incorporates transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), transcatheter mitral valve repair, transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion and transcatheter closure of holes in the heart. 

The heart team in this video stressed the need for advanced imaging to plan and guide the procedures. They explain how the center developed its own 3-D imaging software and worked with Philips healthcare to commercialize some of the technologies, including the EchoNavigator system used to fuse live angiography with live transesophageal echo (TEE).

 

Related University of Colorado Hospital Content:

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado — Interview with John Carroll, M.D., and Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: The Role of Advanced Imaging in Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: Advice For Hospitals Starting a Structural Heart Program — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

VIDEO: The Evolution of Complex PCI at University of Colorado — Interview with John Messenger, M.D., and Kevin Rogers, M.D.

VIDEO: Developing New Cath Lab Technologies With Real-time Collaboration Between Industry, Doctors

360 View of the TEE Echo Workstation During a MitraClip Procedure

VIDEO: Walk Through of a Hybrid Cath Lab at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: The Cardiac Surgeon Perspective on Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair — Interview with Joe Cleveland, M.D.

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.,

 

 

 

Structural Heart | May 06, 2019

John Carroll, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology and co-director of the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital, offers an overview of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and American College of Cardiology (STS/ACC) Transcatheter Valve Therapy (TVT) Registry and how it is being used.  The data from the registry is being used to accelerate advancement of transcatheter valve repair and replacement technology and facilitate faster regulatory reviews. This included the FDA's adding of a new indication for the use of current TAVR valves for valve-in-valve procedures. The registry also offers comparisons for things like surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) vs. transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and how procedural volume impacts outcomes.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital 

Reference:

1. John D. Carroll. STS/ACC TVT Registry: Multiple Benefits For All Stakeholders. JACC Mar 13, 2019. 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | May 01, 2019

Alex Haak, Ph.D., clinical scientist at Philips Health Systems North America, is based at the University of Colorado Hospital, to work directly with physicians in the cath lab to gather immediate feedback and improve next generation fusion imaging technologies used for structural heart interventions. Philips worked with the University of Colorado to develop the EchoNavigator, which fuses 3-D anatomical imaging, live transesophageal echo (TEE) and live fluoroscopy in the cath lab to help guide structural heart procedures. Haak is permanently based at the hospital to help trouble shoot and tweak the new EchoNavigator and other interventional guidance technologies being alpha-tested there prior to final commercialization.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Sponsored Videos View all 44 items

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | December 13, 2018

Michael Amponsah, M.D., FACC, an interventional cardiologist at Mohawk Valley Health System, shares a case of Impella CP for a non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patient who presented in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

The patient, a 51-year-old male, was diagnosed with NYHA Class III non-ischemic systolic heart failure with an ejection fraction of 20 percent and an ICD. He presented to the emergency department with ICD shocks and his hemodynamics declined over a 12 hour period and blood work showed a 20 percent decline in kidney function. Amponsah placed a right heart cath and performed an echocardiogram showing LV dysfunction. The team decided to place an Impella CP in the cath lab to support the patient’s heart. This was effective in unloading the LV and organ perfusion. This also provided the team with time to transfer the patient to another facility.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

Cath Lab | November 15, 2018

Navin Kapur, M.D., discusses the results of the FDA STEMI Door-to-Unloading (DTU) safety and feasibility randomized controlled trial, presented as a late-breaking study at the 2018 American Heart Association meeting. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Cath Lab | November 07, 2018

In 2009, the GuideLiner Catheter revolutionized the concept of guide extension, creating new possibilities in interventional cardiology. Now in its third generation, the GuideLiner V3 Catheter continues to build on a history of innovation and performance — one that has been demonstrated with more than half a million catheters in cath labs around the world.

Teleflex also offers a family of Turnpike Catheters. These contain a robust multi-layer shaft that provides impressive flexibility, torque and tracking over a 0.014” guidewire in complex coronary and peripheral interventions. The unique five-layer composite shaft provides an ideal combination of flexibility and torque response to help navigate through complex anatomy while the outer polymer layer paired with a 60 cm distal hydrophilic coating facilitates smooth catheter delivery. This portfolio consists of the Turnpike Catheter (standard version), the Turnpike Spiral Catheter, the Turnpike Gold Catheter, and the Turnpike LP Catheter. Each catheter configuration contains a specific design element to address various clinical challenges in complex procedures

This year, Teleflex acquired two well-known PTCA balloon catheters. The Chocolate XD PTCA Balloon Catheter is a specialty angioplasty balloon, used in the pre-dilatation and treatment of coronary lesions. The balloon’s proprietary nitinol constraining structure creates “pillows” and “grooves” that are designed to provide controlled dilatation while minimizing vessel wall trauma.

The Glider PTCA Balloon Catheter is a semi-compliant balloon with a skived tip and low entry profile. The tip design, coupled with hydrophilic coating and an innovative, torqueable shaft, allows for precise tip orientation for use in crossing complex lesions and stent struts.

For more information: www.teleflex.com

Cath Lab | October 24, 2018

Michael Flaherty, M.D., discusses a study published in Circulation Research which finds that use of hemodynamic support with the Impella 2.5 heart pump during high-risk PCI can reduce the risk of AKI even when those patients had pre-existing kidney disease and a low ejection fraction. For more information: http://bit.ly/2Pfaqxh

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.

 

Conference Videos View all 336 items

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how the heart's left atrial appendage (LAA) can be evaluated for thrombus and possible transcatheter occlusion using a new cardiac ultrasound lighting technology called TrueVue. It is a movable virtual light source that can interact with the echocardiography images to show photorealistic, virtual surgical views of the cardiac anatomy. The light source can be moved anywhere in the image, including behind structures to backlight them. The technology is offered on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound system. It was shown for the first time in the U.S. at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting.

See another VIDEO example of the photo-realistic lighting technology showing a transcatheter ASD closure with two Amplatzer occluders.

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019

Paul Chang, M.D., professor of radiology, vice chair of radiology informatics and medical director for enterprise imaging, University of Chicago, explains some of the issues with artificial intelligence (AI) and how hospitals can better prepare for its eventual implementation across the field medicine. A key takeaway is that hospitals need an infrastructure and roadway for AI and deep-learning algorithms to operate. Chang said most health systems will not invest directly in AI, but will invest in analytics, which Chang said uses much of the same infrastructure required by AI.

Chang spoke on this topic at an AIMed breakfast briefing seminar in Chicago April 9, 2019. Listen to a webcast of this hour and 15 minute talk.

 

 

 

Wearables | March 26, 2019

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, staff physician in the Section of Electrophysiology and Pacing in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, explains how wearable devices and smart phone apps can be used to aid electrophysiologists in patient care. He said the devices offer a constant remote monitoring of patient heart data, which can be helpful in diagnosing various types of arrhythmias and cardiac conditions. However, the main issue is how to sort through the large volumes of data and to figure out what the clinical value of some of this consumer data is through studies.  He spoke at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

Other Cardiac Wearable Content:

VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — Interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D.

VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare — Interview with Karl Poterack, M.D.

 

 

Cardiovascular Business | March 26, 2019

William Pinsky, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist and CEO of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), and Mandeep Mehra, M.D., medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Heart and Vascular Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, explain the U.S. doctor shortage and how foreign doctors help fill the gap.

According to 2017 data provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), 40 percent of interventional cardiologists, 30 percent of cardiovascular disease specialists, and 26 percent of pediatric cardiologists in the United States are international medical graduates (IMGs). However, as the physician shortage continues to impact primary care doctors, psychiatrists, OB/GYNs, among others, the U.S. also expects to see a shortage of cardiologists within the next 10 years, according to a spotlight cardiology study issued by the professional services firm PYA, which specialized in healthcare consulting.

The interview was shot at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

 

Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019

Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

Cath Lab View all 215 items

Cath Lab | May 20, 2019

This is a walk through of the primary structural heart hybrid cath lab at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Mich. It is the hospital's newest lab and is centered around a Philips Azurion angiography system, which is a low dose imaging system that significantly reduces dose exposure compared to previous generation systems. As seen in the video, the lab is also equipped with a vascular access ultrasound system, transesophageal echo (TEE) system, an Abiomed Impella console, a large number of storage cabinets, surgical lighting for cases that convert over to open surgery or for transapical TAVR access, movable radiation shielding and ample space to accommodate surgical equipment and extra staff involved in structural heart procedures. There also is an electrosurgical cutter unit in the lab, which Henry Ford operators use to perform transcaval access TAVR procedures for patients who have anatomical challenges to the femoral access route. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program

 

Find more Henry Ford videos and news.

 

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

University of Colorado Hospital | May 09, 2019

Interview with John Carroll, M.D., director of interventional cardiology, Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, and James Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the 3-D imaging lab at the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital. They discuss how the structural heart program was created and how they invested in advanced imaging to grew into one of the most advanced programs in the country. They explain how the program now incorporates transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), transcatheter mitral valve repair, transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion and transcatheter closure of holes in the heart. 

The heart team in this video stressed the need for advanced imaging to plan and guide the procedures. They explain how the center developed its own 3-D imaging software and worked with Philips healthcare to commercialize some of the technologies, including the EchoNavigator system used to fuse live angiography with live transesophageal echo (TEE).

 

Related University of Colorado Hospital Content:

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado — Interview with John Carroll, M.D., and Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: The Role of Advanced Imaging in Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: Advice For Hospitals Starting a Structural Heart Program — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

VIDEO: The Evolution of Complex PCI at University of Colorado — Interview with John Messenger, M.D., and Kevin Rogers, M.D.

VIDEO: Developing New Cath Lab Technologies With Real-time Collaboration Between Industry, Doctors

360 View of the TEE Echo Workstation During a MitraClip Procedure

VIDEO: Walk Through of a Hybrid Cath Lab at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: The Cardiac Surgeon Perspective on Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair — Interview with Joe Cleveland, M.D.

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.,

 

 

 

Structural Heart | May 06, 2019

John Carroll, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology and co-director of the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital, offers an overview of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and American College of Cardiology (STS/ACC) Transcatheter Valve Therapy (TVT) Registry and how it is being used.  The data from the registry is being used to accelerate advancement of transcatheter valve repair and replacement technology and facilitate faster regulatory reviews. This included the FDA's adding of a new indication for the use of current TAVR valves for valve-in-valve procedures. The registry also offers comparisons for things like surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) vs. transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and how procedural volume impacts outcomes.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital 

Reference:

1. John D. Carroll. STS/ACC TVT Registry: Multiple Benefits For All Stakeholders. JACC Mar 13, 2019. 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | May 01, 2019

Alex Haak, Ph.D., clinical scientist at Philips Health Systems North America, is based at the University of Colorado Hospital, to work directly with physicians in the cath lab to gather immediate feedback and improve next generation fusion imaging technologies used for structural heart interventions. Philips worked with the University of Colorado to develop the EchoNavigator, which fuses 3-D anatomical imaging, live transesophageal echo (TEE) and live fluoroscopy in the cath lab to help guide structural heart procedures. Haak is permanently based at the hospital to help trouble shoot and tweak the new EchoNavigator and other interventional guidance technologies being alpha-tested there prior to final commercialization.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart | April 25, 2019

Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program.

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

 

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | April 25, 2019

This video offers an overview of the Watchman left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder system, including information of its design, implantation and clinical data supporting its use. Catheter-based LAA occlusion is used to seal off the LAA in the heart, which is the source of most stroke-causing clots in patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib). The device be used in place of anticoagulation therapy for stroke prevention. 

 

Related LAA Occlusion Content:

VIDEO: New Data on LAA Occlusion From the PREVAIL and PROTECT Trials — Interview with Vivek Reddy, M.D.

Occluding the Left Atrial Appendage (LAA)

VIDEO: Comparison Between Watchman vs. Amulet LAA Occluders — Interview with Ashish Pershad, M.D.

Device-related Thrombus After Watchman LAA Closure Occurs in Small Number of Patients

Closure of Left Atrial Appendage During Heart Surgery Protects the Brain

 

Cardiac Imaging View all 201 items

Medical 3-D Printing | May 21, 2019

This is a sample of the 3-D printed hearts and coronary anatomy models created from patient CT scans to enable anatomical assessment, device sizing and plan which devices to use and navigation for complex structural heart cases at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. These hearts are in the office of Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, at Henry Ford. She is in charge of a robust 3-D printing program to aid the structural heart program, which surpassed its 1,000th patient printed heart earlier in 2019. 

 

Realted Content With Wang:

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer Aided Design

VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

Cath Lab | May 20, 2019

This is a walk through of the primary structural heart hybrid cath lab at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Mich. It is the hospital's newest lab and is centered around a Philips Azurion angiography system, which is a low dose imaging system that significantly reduces dose exposure compared to previous generation systems. As seen in the video, the lab is also equipped with a vascular access ultrasound system, transesophageal echo (TEE) system, an Abiomed Impella console, a large number of storage cabinets, surgical lighting for cases that convert over to open surgery or for transapical TAVR access, movable radiation shielding and ample space to accommodate surgical equipment and extra staff involved in structural heart procedures. There also is an electrosurgical cutter unit in the lab, which Henry Ford operators use to perform transcaval access TAVR procedures for patients who have anatomical challenges to the femoral access route. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program

 

Find more Henry Ford videos and news.

 

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how the heart's left atrial appendage (LAA) can be evaluated for thrombus and possible transcatheter occlusion using a new cardiac ultrasound lighting technology called TrueVue. It is a movable virtual light source that can interact with the echocardiography images to show photorealistic, virtual surgical views of the cardiac anatomy. The light source can be moved anywhere in the image, including behind structures to backlight them. The technology is offered on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound system. It was shown for the first time in the U.S. at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting.

See another VIDEO example of the photo-realistic lighting technology showing a transcatheter ASD closure with two Amplatzer occluders.

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

University of Colorado Hospital | May 09, 2019

Interview with John Carroll, M.D., director of interventional cardiology, Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, and James Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the 3-D imaging lab at the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital. They discuss how the structural heart program was created and how they invested in advanced imaging to grew into one of the most advanced programs in the country. They explain how the program now incorporates transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), transcatheter mitral valve repair, transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion and transcatheter closure of holes in the heart. 

The heart team in this video stressed the need for advanced imaging to plan and guide the procedures. They explain how the center developed its own 3-D imaging software and worked with Philips healthcare to commercialize some of the technologies, including the EchoNavigator system used to fuse live angiography with live transesophageal echo (TEE).

 

Related University of Colorado Hospital Content:

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado — Interview with John Carroll, M.D., and Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: The Role of Advanced Imaging in Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: Advice For Hospitals Starting a Structural Heart Program — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

VIDEO: The Evolution of Complex PCI at University of Colorado — Interview with John Messenger, M.D., and Kevin Rogers, M.D.

VIDEO: Developing New Cath Lab Technologies With Real-time Collaboration Between Industry, Doctors

360 View of the TEE Echo Workstation During a MitraClip Procedure

VIDEO: Walk Through of a Hybrid Cath Lab at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: The Cardiac Surgeon Perspective on Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair — Interview with Joe Cleveland, M.D.

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.,

 

 

 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | May 01, 2019

Alex Haak, Ph.D., clinical scientist at Philips Health Systems North America, is based at the University of Colorado Hospital, to work directly with physicians in the cath lab to gather immediate feedback and improve next generation fusion imaging technologies used for structural heart interventions. Philips worked with the University of Colorado to develop the EchoNavigator, which fuses 3-D anatomical imaging, live transesophageal echo (TEE) and live fluoroscopy in the cath lab to help guide structural heart procedures. Haak is permanently based at the hospital to help trouble shoot and tweak the new EchoNavigator and other interventional guidance technologies being alpha-tested there prior to final commercialization.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart | April 25, 2019

Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program.

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

 

Cardiac Diagnostics View all 48 items

Cardiac Diagnostics | March 26, 2019

Kim Allan Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of the Division of Cardiology and the James B. Herrick Professor at Rush University Medical Center, , and former American College of cardiology (ACC) president, discusses the importance of a plant-based diet to improve cardiovascular health and why he went vegan.

 

Other Interviews With Dr. Williams:

VIDEO: Reducing Hypertension Among African-Americans

VIDEO: Imaging in the Assessment of Preventive Cardiology

 

Wearables | March 26, 2019

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, staff physician in the Section of Electrophysiology and Pacing in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, explains how wearable devices and smart phone apps can be used to aid electrophysiologists in patient care. He said the devices offer a constant remote monitoring of patient heart data, which can be helpful in diagnosing various types of arrhythmias and cardiac conditions. However, the main issue is how to sort through the large volumes of data and to figure out what the clinical value of some of this consumer data is through studies.  He spoke at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

Other Cardiac Wearable Content:

VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — Interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D.

VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare — Interview with Karl Poterack, M.D.

 

 

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

ECG | March 05, 2019

This is a quick demo of the Schiller Cardiovit FT-1 electrocardiograph (ECG) system displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. It has a 3-D rendering of a patient showing where each lead needs to be placed. The user can rotate the images on the touch screen to see where the leads go and can easily identify where any issues are when the system automatically alerts them about misplaced leads. The goal is to improve and speed ECGs using a better form of visualization than the traditional black and white 2-D pictures. The system changes the lead place placements of the body rending based on the type of exam being performed using a drop down menu.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Chang is head of the artificial intelligence organization AIMed, which hosts educational sessions and an annual meeting on AI applications in medicine.

Listen to Chang in the PODCAST: Fitting Artificial Intelligence Into Cardiology.
 

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Wearables | February 28, 2019

Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Israel,  discusses his center's use of wearable devices to manage a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. He spoke on the topic at 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.   

Sheba Medical Center in Israel has adopted an app that interfaces with various wearables and Bluetooth-enabled patient monitoring devices to create remote cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure programs. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. The app is able to transfer device data to an EMR so progress and tasks assigned to patients can be monitored without the need for them to come into the hospital for sessions. Klempfner recently wrote a paper on this topic

Watch the related VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Wearables | February 28, 2019

How wearable devices will play a role in healthcare was a big topic at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The biggest question is how to attached the data from consumer devices into a usable format for clinicians that interfaces with the electronic medical record (EMR). A good example of how wearables are being integrated in clinical care was demonstrated by the company Datos. It offers software that can integrate data from a wide variety of wearable devices from several makers into a mobile app, It can transfer the information to an EMR. The app also offers two way communication between the patient and the doctor’s office. It can prompt patients with a list of things they need to do each day to reach physician specified goals and displays analytics on a patient’s health data, including charts and graphs.

The system is used by Sheba Medical Center in Israel for a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. Watch the VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — an interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center.
 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

EP Lab View all 55 items

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | April 25, 2019

This video offers an overview of the Watchman left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder system, including information of its design, implantation and clinical data supporting its use. Catheter-based LAA occlusion is used to seal off the LAA in the heart, which is the source of most stroke-causing clots in patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib). The device be used in place of anticoagulation therapy for stroke prevention. 

 

Related LAA Occlusion Content:

VIDEO: New Data on LAA Occlusion From the PREVAIL and PROTECT Trials — Interview with Vivek Reddy, M.D.

Occluding the Left Atrial Appendage (LAA)

VIDEO: Comparison Between Watchman vs. Amulet LAA Occluders — Interview with Ashish Pershad, M.D.

Device-related Thrombus After Watchman LAA Closure Occurs in Small Number of Patients

Closure of Left Atrial Appendage During Heart Surgery Protects the Brain

 

March 28, 2019

Interview with Frederick Masoudi, M.D., FACC, FAHA, professor of cardiology at the University of Colorado Hospital, and a physician leader of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR). The NCDR is the American College of Cardiology's suite of cardiovascular data registries helping hospitals and private practices measure and improve the quality of care they provide.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

Wearables | March 26, 2019

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, staff physician in the Section of Electrophysiology and Pacing in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, explains how wearable devices and smart phone apps can be used to aid electrophysiologists in patient care. He said the devices offer a constant remote monitoring of patient heart data, which can be helpful in diagnosing various types of arrhythmias and cardiac conditions. However, the main issue is how to sort through the large volumes of data and to figure out what the clinical value of some of this consumer data is through studies.  He spoke at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

Other Cardiac Wearable Content:

VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — Interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D.

VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare — Interview with Karl Poterack, M.D.

 

 

EP Lab | March 21, 2019

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, section of electrophysiology and pacing in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. He presented the WRAP-IT late-breaking trial at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. The trial looked at the use of an antibacterial envelope for pacemakers and ICDs to reduce infection risk. 

Read the ACC.19 article Medtronic Tyrx Envelope Significantly Reduces Major Infections in Cardiac Implantable Device Patients.

 

Rlated EP video From ACC.19:

VIDEO: Key Trends in Electrophysiology — Apple Watch to Detect AF and the CABANA Trial — Interview with Christine Albert, M.D.

 

 

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

EP Lab | January 03, 2019

This is a quick video tour of one of the dedicated electrophysiology (EP) labs at the University of Colorado Hospital. The room is built around a Siemens Artis Q.zen bi-plane angiography system. The system allows low radiation fluoro imaging, which reduced exposure to both patients and operators during long EP ablation procedures. 

Equipment in stock in this lab includes the Medtronic Artic Front cryoablation balloon.

Watch the VIDEO: Cryoballoon Ablation Best Practice Guidelines, an interview with Wilber Su, M.D.

Watch the related VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital
 

Find more articles and videos on the University of Colorado Hospital

Information Technology View all 124 items

Medical 3-D Printing | May 21, 2019

This is a sample of the 3-D printed hearts and coronary anatomy models created from patient CT scans to enable anatomical assessment, device sizing and plan which devices to use and navigation for complex structural heart cases at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. These hearts are in the office of Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, at Henry Ford. She is in charge of a robust 3-D printing program to aid the structural heart program, which surpassed its 1,000th patient printed heart earlier in 2019. 

 

Realted Content With Wang:

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer Aided Design

VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

Heart Valve Technology | May 20, 2019

A demonstration of how to calculate the neo-left ventricular outflow tract (neo-LVOT) on CT imaging for a transcatheter mitral valve replacement using Circle Imaging's advanced visualization software. The demonstration looks at the use of an Edward's Sapien valve being implanted for a mitral valve-in-valve procedure. The overhang of the Sapien can block the LVOT blood flow, which can be catastrophic for the patient. So, assessment of the neo-LVOT in a simulation of the implant is required prior to the procedure to find the ideal landing zone and assess if the patient's anatomy is compatible with this technique.  

Watch the related VIDEO: The Importance of the Neo-LVOT in Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement — an interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital. 

This clip was recorded on the expo floor at the 2018 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

 

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how the heart's left atrial appendage (LAA) can be evaluated for thrombus and possible transcatheter occlusion using a new cardiac ultrasound lighting technology called TrueVue. It is a movable virtual light source that can interact with the echocardiography images to show photorealistic, virtual surgical views of the cardiac anatomy. The light source can be moved anywhere in the image, including behind structures to backlight them. The technology is offered on the Philips Healthcare Epiq CVx cardiovascular ultrasound system. It was shown for the first time in the U.S. at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting.

See another VIDEO example of the photo-realistic lighting technology showing a transcatheter ASD closure with two Amplatzer occluders.

 

Stroke | May 16, 2019

This is an example of a carotid artery reporting module from Change Healthcare at 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. It shows how the PACS can bring in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery and the graphical report can be modified to match the patient anatomy. The text and modifications made to the vessel tree convert into text to help auto-fill fields in the written report to help speed workflow. The vessel tree is similar to cath lab reporting systems that use a similar model of the coronaries that can be modified and helps auto complete the cath report.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: What to Look for in PACS Workflow Efficiency

6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Imaging

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

 

University of Colorado Hospital | May 09, 2019

Interview with John Carroll, M.D., director of interventional cardiology, Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, and James Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the 3-D imaging lab at the Cardiac and Vascular Center at the University of Colorado Hospital. They discuss how the structural heart program was created and how they invested in advanced imaging to grew into one of the most advanced programs in the country. They explain how the program now incorporates transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), transcatheter mitral valve repair, transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR), left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion and transcatheter closure of holes in the heart. 

The heart team in this video stressed the need for advanced imaging to plan and guide the procedures. They explain how the center developed its own 3-D imaging software and worked with Philips healthcare to commercialize some of the technologies, including the EchoNavigator system used to fuse live angiography with live transesophageal echo (TEE).

 

Related University of Colorado Hospital Content:

Highlighting Innovation at the University of Colorado Hospital Cardiology Program

VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado — Interview with John Carroll, M.D., and Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: The Role of Advanced Imaging in Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Robert Quaife, M.D.

VIDEO: Advice For Hospitals Starting a Structural Heart Program — Interview with John Carroll, M.D.

VIDEO: The Evolution of Complex PCI at University of Colorado — Interview with John Messenger, M.D., and Kevin Rogers, M.D.

VIDEO: Developing New Cath Lab Technologies With Real-time Collaboration Between Industry, Doctors

360 View of the TEE Echo Workstation During a MitraClip Procedure

VIDEO: Walk Through of a Hybrid Cath Lab at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital

VIDEO: The Cardiac Surgeon Perspective on Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair — Interview with Joe Cleveland, M.D.

VIDEO: An Overview of PFO Closure to Treat Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with Karen Orjuela, M.D.,

 

 

 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | May 01, 2019

Alex Haak, Ph.D., clinical scientist at Philips Health Systems North America, is based at the University of Colorado Hospital, to work directly with physicians in the cath lab to gather immediate feedback and improve next generation fusion imaging technologies used for structural heart interventions. Philips worked with the University of Colorado to develop the EchoNavigator, which fuses 3-D anatomical imaging, live transesophageal echo (TEE) and live fluoroscopy in the cath lab to help guide structural heart procedures. Haak is permanently based at the hospital to help trouble shoot and tweak the new EchoNavigator and other interventional guidance technologies being alpha-tested there prior to final commercialization.

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart | April 25, 2019

Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program.

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

 

 

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Overlay Init