Videos | Heart Valve Technology | February 18, 2020

VIDEO: Use of a Temporary Pacing Lead in TAVR

Andrew Weintraub, M.D., FACC, associate director, of the Interventional Cardiology and Vascular Center, medical director of the Vascular and Structural Heart Center, Tufts Medical Center, discusses the use of temporary pacing in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients. Implantation of TAVR valves can cause pressure from the valve against the septal wall of the heart, causing conduction delays. These delays do not necessarily mean the patient needs a permanent pacemaker.

Instead, Tufts Medical Center uses temporary pacing leads, a small catheter with two electrodes, placed in the right ventricle of the heart through a vein in the groin or neck. The lead is then connected to an external pacemaker allowing a physician to monitor and control a patient’s heart rate for up to several days.  The center uses the BioTrace Medical Tempo Lead, which incorporates a novel active fixation mechanism, bipolar electrodes and a soft tip. Stabilizers provide secure fixation and maintain stable pace capture. An elastomeric balloon may be inflated to aid passage of the lead through the venous vasculature and into the right ventricle, and  aids in wall apposition during deployment of the stabilizers. This design helps secure and stabilize the cardiac pacing lead with the goal of reducing complications and allowing patients to ambulate sooner after procedures.

 

Related Content:

VIDEO: Overview of the TAVR Program at Tufts Medical Center — Interview with Andrew Weintraub, M.D.

VIDEO: The Expansion of TAVR Following the FDA Clearing its Use in All Patients — Interview with Torsten Vahl, M.D.

VIDEO: Overview of the Structural Heart Program at Tufts Medical Center — Interview with Charles D. Resor, M.D.,

 

Find more content on Tufts Medical Center

 

 

 

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Structural Heart | October 14, 2021

Tiberio Frisoli, M.D., interventional structural cardiologist, senior staff physician, Henry Ford Hospital, explains how his center performs transcaval transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) access for patients who have suboptimal abdominal aortic and femoral vascular anatomy. Transcaval access was pioneered at Henry Ford Hospital and involves using femoral vein access and then using a surgical radio frequency cutter to bore a hole from the interior venacava into the aorta to allow the TAVR delivery catheter to path through. 

This procedure was developed to enable more patients to receive TAVR via the preferred femoral access route. Some patients are not candidates for femoral artery access because of calcified lesions and heart atherosclerotic plaque, which narrows the vessel lumen, and makes it difficult to thread catheters through. The transcaval access technique can bypass the restricted arteries or heavy calcified plaques to still enable a minimally invasive procedure without the need for surgery. 

This video was produced in partnership from Henry Ford Hospital.

Related Transcaval TAVR Content:

VIDEO: Transcaval Access in TAVR Procedures — Interview with Adam Greenbaum, M.D.

How to Perform Transcaval TAVR Access

VIDEO: Walk Through of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Cath Lab

Study Deems Transcaval Valve Replacement Pioneered at Henry Ford Hospital Successful

First Transcaval Aortic Valve Replacement Performed in Europe

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

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Stem Cell Therapies | October 04, 2021

Mechanical engineering Professor Nathan Sniadecki, associate chair for research and infrastructure, mechanical engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, explains his department's development of engineered heart tissue that can beat. The "heart or organ in a dish" technology allows cardiac myocytes to be tested in a lab with various drugs or other influences to see what the impact would be on the heart. 

This technology developed at UW was sent to the International Space Station in 2020 to help evaluate the impact of zero-gravity on the heart. This research plays a critical role in understanding the impact on the human heart in long-duration space flights to places like Mars or beyond. 

The bioengineered tissue is the length of a couple grains of rice set between two posts so the tightening and stretching of cardiac muscles can be measured. 

Read more details in the article Tiny Beating Hearts Created With Stem Cells at the University of Washington.

 

EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Structural Heart | September 28, 2021

Tom Jones, M.D., director, cardiac cath labs, Seattle Children’s Hospital, and principle investigator of the Medtronic Harmony transcatheter pulmonary valve trial, explains the differences between the Melody and Harmony valves. He also explains the history of congenital heart transcatheter valve development over the past 20 years and how adult structural heart devices also developed side-by-side with these devices. 

Patients with tetralogy of fallot often received the ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) in an initial surgery and a second surgery in needed later for a pulmonary valve. As valves wear out, additional open heart surgeries are needed. The Harmony and Melody help reduce the number of open heart surgeries in these patients. Jones said the Harmony valve may help reduce or eliminate the need for open heart surgeries.

The Melody was the first transcatheter valve to gain approval for use in the United States. It was designed to treat patients who already had a surgically placed RVOT. The Harmony valve was then developed to address patients who also needed the RVOT. Between the two valves, Jones said the majority of congenital heart issues can now be treat.

Jones said about 40,000-50,000 babies are born each year in the United States with congenital heart defects that the Harmony and Melody valves might be used to help. He said the Melody valve was able to help about 25% of these patients, and the Harmony valve now can help the rest of these patients with a transcatheter solution. 
 

Related Congenital Heart Content:

VIDEO: Harmony Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Has Good Outcomes at 1 Year — Interview with Tom Jones, M.D.

FDA Clears First Device to Treat Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Congenital Heart Disease 

FDA Expands Indication for Melody Transcatheter Valve for Failed Surgical Valves

VIDEO: The Heart Team Approach in Congenital Structural Heart Interventions — Interview with Tom Jones, M.D.

 

VIDEO: Advances in Congenital Heart Therapy Technologies — Interview with Tom Jones, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Virtual Reality to Aid Congenital Heart Disease — Interview with David M. Axelrod, M.D.

Medtronic Shares Two-Year Harmony Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Results

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Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.
 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

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January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Conference Coverage View all 443 items

EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

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Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

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VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

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EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D., at HIMSS21

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D., at HIMSS21

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

Related Dynamic Blood Flow Echo Imaging Content:

Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee Adopts Latest Echocardiography Imaging Software

A Glimpse Into the Future of Cardiac Ultrasound

Analogic Introduces New Premium Cardiac Imaging Software for bk3500 Ultrasound System

Improving Stent Designs With Computational Fluid Dynamics

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EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D., at HIMSS21

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D., at HIMSS21

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

Related Dynamic Blood Flow Echo Imaging Content:

Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee Adopts Latest Echocardiography Imaging Software

A Glimpse Into the Future of Cardiac Ultrasound

Analogic Introduces New Premium Cardiac Imaging Software for bk3500 Ultrasound System

Improving Stent Designs With Computational Fluid Dynamics

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac Ultrasound Technology at ASE 2017

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EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D., at HIMSS21

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D., at HIMSS21

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

Related Dynamic Blood Flow Echo Imaging Content:

Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee Adopts Latest Echocardiography Imaging Software

A Glimpse Into the Future of Cardiac Ultrasound

Analogic Introduces New Premium Cardiac Imaging Software for bk3500 Ultrasound System

Improving Stent Designs With Computational Fluid Dynamics

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac Ultrasound Technology at ASE 2017

EP Lab View all 80 items

EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D., at HIMSS21

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D., at HIMSS21

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

Related Dynamic Blood Flow Echo Imaging Content:

Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee Adopts Latest Echocardiography Imaging Software

A Glimpse Into the Future of Cardiac Ultrasound

Analogic Introduces New Premium Cardiac Imaging Software for bk3500 Ultrasound System

Improving Stent Designs With Computational Fluid Dynamics

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac Ultrasound Technology at ASE 2017

Information Technology View all 163 items

EP Lab | October 04, 2021

Khaldoun Tarakji, M.D., MPH, associate section head, cardiac electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic, was the lead author on a followup study to the landmark WRAP-IT trial that showed the Tyrx bioresorbable antibacterial envelope was shown it significantly lower infection risk for patients who receive cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) and develop hematomas.[1] 

The study results showed an 82% reduction in major infection among patients with hematoma in patients who had received the Tyrx. It is a antimicrobial envelope that is used to place implantable electrophysiology (EP) devices inside prior to closing the device pocket. While the envelope itself did not prevent hemotomas, as the rate was the same in the control group with out it, the Tyrx did lower infection rates in patients with hemotomas.

Read more in the article Tyrx Absorbable Antibacterial Envelope Effectively Reduces Infections in Cardiac Device Patients with Hematomas.

 

Reference:

1. Khaldoun G. Tarakji, Panagiotis Korantzopoulos, Francois Philippon, Jeff D. Lande, Swathi Seshadri, Bruce L. Wilkoff, et al. Infectious consequences of hematoma from cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and the role of the antibiotic envelope: A WRAP-IT Trial Analysis. Heart Rhythm. Punlished online July 16, 2021. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2021.07.011.

 

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

One of the trends in cardiovascular information system (CVIS) and radiology PACS at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 conference was the deeper integration of third-party image analysis software and artificial intelligence (AI) into these systems. This eliminates software sitting on top of the CVIS or PACS, separate logins or needing to us a different screen or manually transferring information from the third-party app in into the final report.

A good example of this was Siemens Healthineers, which demonstrated a deep integration with Epsilon Imaging’s echocardiography strain imaging analysis software. The integration eliminates the need for a separate login to the software, and automated quantification and images are carried over directly into the syngo echo report.

Strain can be used to assess cardiac function more precisely than regular cardiac ultrasound exams. It has grown in its use for cardio-oncology programs, assessing a baseline cardiac function and the. Performing serial exams over the course of a cancer patient’s chemotherapy. Strain has seen growing interest and has been a hot topic the past couple years at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) meeting. Interest also has expanded greatly recently with reimbursement now available in the U.S.

Siemens said there also has been increased interest in strain this past year because it can show early indicators of cardiac issues in COVID-19 patients and can be used to help monitor COVID myocarditis patients.
 

Related Strain Echo and HIMSS Content:

VIDEO: An Overview of Echo Strain Imaging — Interview with Marielle Scherrer-Crosbie, M.D.

Global Longitudinal Strain Echo Offers Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Heart Damage From Chemotherapy

Strain Imaging Improves Cardiac Surveillance of Certain Breast Cancer Patients

VIDEO: Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Echo Imaging — Interview with Federico Asch, M.D.

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy

 

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D., at HIMSS21

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D., at HIMSS21

Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) | August 31, 2021

The vendor MediCardia demonstrated smart software to aggregate cardiology patient data from numerous locations into one place at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference. This enables one dashboard view of the patient's relevant cardiac history, prior exams, imaging, ECGs, labs and procedures. It also uses artificial intelligence (AI) to pull key data elements about the patient to automatically create risk assessments based on current guidelines in a graphical format.

The interactive system also allows the cardiologist to adjust parameters in the patient risk score to immediately show the patient any impact on their score. This includes if they stopped smoking, began taking statins, etc. The dynamic graphics of the system are also designed to be more engaging with a patient during consultations, rather than plain white pages of reports.

MediCardia HeartChart is a cardiology-focused virtual care platform that serves as a unified and common interface for EHRs and remote technologies including wearables, consumer home medical devices, and implanted cardiac rhythm devices. 

Related HIMSS CVIS and PACS Content:

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 17, 2021

A new ultrasound imaging technology that may offer novel ways to diagnose and better understand cardiac diseases using dynamic blood flow imaging. This allows imaging of individual blood cells or contrast bubbles as they travel through the heart and vessels, showing detail in how the blood moves and swirls. These motions, including the formation of vortices, may offer new insight into different disease states and allow earlier diagnosis and a understand better when to intervene.

The examples shown in this short video are from Hitachi and GE Healthcare, both of which have highlighted this technology at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) annual meetings over the past four years.

Ultrasound vendors use different technology approaches, including vector flow imaging, particle imaging velocimetry and blood speckle tracking. All of them show small lines or arrows to indicate the direction the blood cells or bubbles are traveling, and color codes to indicate velocity. Some vendors offer quantification for some new measures of blood flow, but as of yet, there are no guidelines or standardized indexes as to what these numbers mean.

This technology has been discussed in research sessions at the IEEE and the ASE over the past several years. However, more research is needed to show the prognostic value of the technology. Research to date shows it is possible that the swirling of blood can indicate less efficient flow, which may have implications in the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and advancement of valvular disease. In the coronary arteries, research has shown there may be a connection between sheer stresses and disrupted blood flow in the formation of plaques on artery walls.

Companies that have developed echo blood flow dynamics imaging on their ultrasound systems to date include Hitachi, GE Healthcare, Fujifilm, Mindray and BK Medical. 

Read more about this technology from ASE 2021 in the article Development of Echo Blood Flow Dynamics Imaging.
 

Related Dynamic Blood Flow Echo Imaging Content:

Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee Adopts Latest Echocardiography Imaging Software

A Glimpse Into the Future of Cardiac Ultrasound

Analogic Introduces New Premium Cardiac Imaging Software for bk3500 Ultrasound System

Improving Stent Designs With Computational Fluid Dynamics

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac Ultrasound Technology at ASE 2017

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