Feature | April 27, 2012

Cardiovascular Nuclear Imaging Advances Highlighted at SNM Symposium

April 27, 2012 — More than 150 molecular imaging professionals gathered last week at the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s third Multimodality Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Symposium held at the National Institutes of Health. The two and a half day symposium brought together individuals from multiple scientific disciplines — including chemistry, engineering, physics, molecular biology, cardiovascular physiology and imaging sciences — with the goal of promoting the emerging field of cardiovascular molecular imaging.

“Our program this year focused on advances in targeted imaging of the cardiovascular system including imaging of cardiovascular receptors, stem cell therapy, vascular biology, myocardial metabolism and other relevant biological processes,” said Albert J. Sinusas, M.D., program chair of the symposium. “The symposium proved to be very successful, stimulating further interest in the field and advancing the promotion of basic science research and the development of clinical applications in cardiovascular molecular imaging.”

The first day of the symposium highlighted the development and application of novel imaging probes for evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular disease, along with novel hybrid imaging technology. The imaging technologies reviewed included; fluorescence imaging, chemical exchange saturation contrast imaging, optoacoustic imaging, multispectral CT as well as microSPECT and microPET imaging. Professor Jason S. Lewis, Ph.D., vice chair of radiology and chief attending of the radiochemistry and imaging sciences service in the Department of Radiology at Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases, in New York City, presented a keynote address on molecular imaging agents that are currently in translation for imaging cancer.

Lewis noted, “Now is a particularly interesting time for the field of cardiology. We have multiple new agents coming down the pipeline in the oncology world that can be used in various imaging capacities; there are hopefully a lot of interesting parallels and lessons to be learnt in the nuclear cardiology field based on our experience with cancer. Having these new targeted imaging options allows us to personalize medicine to make sure that the patient is getting the most appropriate test for their indication.”

Attendees switched their focus to specific diseases on day two of the symposium and learned about imaging of atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling, imaging angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, metabolic imaging of the heart, imaging of myocardial injury, repair and remodeling. Ira Tabas, M.D., Ph.D., provided another keynote lecture on the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and the associated implications for targeted imaging of the vasculature. The symposium concluded with sessions on stem cell therapy and challenges of translation of molecular imaging and therapy, with a third keynote lecture by Lee Josephson, Ph.D.

In addition to scientific program, a total of 22 abstracts representing the most novel ideas in molecular imaging research as applied to the cardiovascular system, were accepted for the symposium’s poster session. The winning abstract for the symposium was “Quantitative first-pass perfusion MRI of the mouse heart: data acquisition, reconstruction, and analysis strategies,” authored by N.K. Naresh. The first runner-up was “Therapeutic efficacy of different liposomal glucocorticoids as a treatment for atherosclerosis assessed by multimodal imaging,” authored by M.E. Lobatto.

For more information: www.snm.org/cmiit

 

Related Content

GE Healthcare, Rapiscan stress imaging agent, North America, Rapidscan Pharma Solutions Inc.
News | Pharmaceuticals| February 07, 2017
GE Healthcare’s Life Sciences business announced in January that it acquired Rapidscan Pharma Solutions Inc., which has...
IBA Molecular, acquisition, Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging, nuclear imaging
News | Nuclear Imaging| January 30, 2017
IBA Molecular has successfully completed its acquisition of Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging, announced in August 2016,...
stress, brain activity, cardiovascular risk, PET-CT, MGH, ISSMS, The Lancet study
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| January 18, 2017
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS) investigators...
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| January 17, 2017
NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC has received additional matching funds from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National...
Medrad Intego PET Infusion System, recall
News | Nuclear Imaging| January 12, 2017
January 12, 2017 — Bayer Healthcare has initiated a recall of all its Medrad Intego PET Infusion System Source Admini
Nuclear cardiology, dose reduction, myocardial perfusion imaging
News | Nuclear Imaging| January 05, 2017
January 5, 2017 — Working in concert, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), the Intersocietal Accreditat
SNMMI Develops USP Recommendations for Compounded Sterile Radiopharmaceuticals
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| December 28, 2016
December 28, 2016 — The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has developed United States Pharmac
PET, F-18 florbetaben, cardiac amyloidosis, Princess Alexandria Hospital

In a pilot study, F-18-florbetaben PET imaging appeared promising for differentiating between cardiac amyloidosis and hypertensive heart disease. Image courtesy of W. Phillip Law/Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.

News | Nuclear Imaging| December 06, 2016
Researchers at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, have demonstrated that cardiac amyloidosis (abnormal...
PET/CT, calcium blockages, heart attack risk, Intermountain study, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | PET-CT| November 15, 2016
Many people who experience chest pain but don’t have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test...
PET/CT, atherosclerotic plaque detection, Stanford University

Application of dual-modality optical and PET/CT activity-based probe in experimental carotid inflammation model. Coronal noninvasive PET/CT scans of (A) healthy and (B) diseased mice with and without ligated carotid arteries respectively. Inset images show optical ex vivo florescence imagining of (A) healthy and (B) diseased carotid arteries.  PET/CT and optical images courtesy of Xiaowei Ma, Toshinobu Saito and Nimali Withana.

News | PET-CT| November 01, 2016
Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated for the first time the use of a dual optical and positron emission...
Overlay Init