Feature | June 02, 2014

St. Jude Medical Completes Acquisition of CardioMEMS

June 2, 2014 — St. Jude Medical announced the completion of its acquisition of the privately held CardioMEMS Inc., developer of the CardioMEMS heart failure (HF) management system. The acquisition was completed on May 30, 2014.

“St. Jude Medical’s acquisition of CardioMEMS shows our commitment to providing innovative medical device solutions that reduce the burden of complex diseases like heart failure, both on patients and healthcare systems. The CardioMEMS HF system achieves this goal by setting a new treatment paradigm for heart failure that reduces hospitalizations and improves the quality of life for patients,” said Daniel J. Starks, chairman, president and CEO of St. Jude Medical.

The CardioMEMS HF system is the first and only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved heart failure monitoring device proven to significantly reduce hospital admissions when used by physicians to manage heart failure. St. Jude Medical will now begin its strategic launch of the CardioMEMS HF system in the United States.

The CardioMEMS HF system allows clinicians to stabilize pulmonary artery pressures by proactively managing medications and other treatment options while also providing an early indication of worsening heart failure, thereby improving heart failure patients’ quality of life, and reducing economic risks for hospitals and payers.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch acted as financial advisor and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP as legal counsel to St. Jude Medical. J.P. Morgan Securities LLC acted as financial advisor to CardioMEMS and Cooley LLP as legal counsel.

For more information: www.sjm.com

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