News | Clinical Decision Support | October 11, 2017

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Add Topics, Increase Diagnostic Imaging Clinical Scenarios

Latest release features five new and seven revised topics, bringing total to 1,570 clinical scenarios

ACR Appropriateness Criteria Add Topics, Increase Diagnostic Imaging Clinical Scenarios

October 11, 2017 — Radiologists can enhance the quality and effectiveness of care with the newest release of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria. The latest edition covers 178 diagnostic imaging and interventional radiology topics with 890 clinical variants. Diagnostic imaging topics now cover 1,570 clinical scenarios. 

This update from the American College of Radiology (ACR) includes five new and seven revised topics. Each topic has a narrative, an evidence table and a literature search summary. 

“These evidence-based guidelines define practice principles to ensure high-quality outcomes and patient safety,” said Frank J. Rybicki, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chair of the ACR Committee on Appropriateness Criteria. “Using them encourages the proper choice of radiologic procedures to reduce both practice variation and performance of unwarranted procedures,” he added.

New topics are: 

Recently revised topics include:

ACR Appropriateness Criteria also address 61 radiation oncology topics — thus covering 235 unique topics. The guidelines are specified appropriate use criteria (AUC) under the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) legislation. They are developed by expert panels of radiologists and other doctors from relevant medical specialties. The ACR is designated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as a qualified Provider-Led Entity. Medical providers may consult the ACR Appropriateness Criteria to fulfill PAMA requirements that they consult AUC prior to ordering advanced diagnostic imaging for Medicare patients.

Read the article "ACR Appropriateness Criteria Now Satisfy Federal AUC Requirements."

For more information: www.acr.org

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