News | March 29, 2010

ACR, RSNA Talk Dose Reduction Strategy in CT, Fluoroscopy

March 29, 2010 - Medical industry leaders gather this week to discuss steps manufacturers of CT and fluoroscopy systems can take to reduce unnecessary patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

E. Stephen Amis, M.D., FACR, co-chair of the ACR/RSNA Joint Task Force on Adult Radiation Protection and past chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Board of Chancellors, and Richard L. Morin, Ph.D., FACR, chair of the American College of Radiology Safety Committee, will represent the ACR at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Public Meeting: Device Improvement to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure from Medical Imaging, March 30-31, in Gaithersburg, Md.

The first day of the sessions will focus on equipment features that manufacturers should incorporate in CT scanners and fluoroscopes to reduce unnecessary exposure. Day two will focus on steps manufacturers should take to improve training of individuals who use these devices and what they can do to improve quality assurance at medical imaging facilities with respect to these two modalities.
Both Dr. Morin and Amis will make scientific presentations during the two-day meeting and serve as part of the primary roundtable during discussion.

ACR members Donald P. Frush, M.D., chair of the ACR Pediatric Imaging Commission, Keith Strauss, M.S., FACR, of the ACR Subcommittee on Radiation Exposure, Marilyn Goske, M.D., chair of the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, and Marta Hernanz Schulman, M.D., FACR, chair of the ACR Pediatrics Guidelines and Standards Committee, will present and participate in roundtable discussions on behalf of the Image Gently campaign. The ACR is a founding member of the Image Gently campaign. Other ACR members are expected to present on their own behalf or as representatives of their facilities.

For more information: www.acr-arrs.org

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