News | October 01, 2007

GE, Lilly to Co-Develop In Vitro Diagnostics

October 1, 2007 – GE Global Research, the General Electric Company’s centralized research and development organization, and GE Healthcare today announced a three-year collaborative research agreement with Eli Lilly and Company to discover and develop advanced in vitro diagnostic assays that may predict cancer treatment response to targeted therapies.

The agreement between GE and Lilly will provide GE with access to clinical tissue samples from unidentified patients enrolled in Lilly’s clinical trials. In turn, Lilly will have access to GE’s advanced technologies in automated tissue-based image analysis and molecular reagents. These tools can be used during drug development to aid Lilly in evaluating the effectiveness of their drug candidates and potentially select patients for future trials.

When asked if Lilly was a rebound after the Abbott deal fell through recently, Joe Hogan, president and CEO of GE Healthcare said, “Abbott was a broad-based diagnostic acquisition, but it did not have molecular diagnostics like the Eli Lilly deal. [With Eli Lilly] we have invested in the pathology piece, which is one of the most exciting parts of the market. We are looking to add to that diagnostics platform.”

The goal of this collaboration is to discover key protein and gene signatures that will predict the likelihood that a medication will be effective in treating certain cancers. Once identified, the signatures can then be used to pre-select patients who are good candidates for the targeted therapy.

Lilly, in addition to its existing chemotherapy agents, is developing targeted cancer therapeutics, which are now in both early and late stage clinical development. GE is developing advanced multiplexed tissue-based assays and image analysis tools that can measure multiple biological pathways.

“The co-development of diagnostics and therapeutics is a major strategy of GE Healthcare’s 'Early Health' vision, and our collaboration with Lilly and our expansion into in vitro diagnostics is right in line with this strategy,” said, Michael Montalto, Ph.D., head of Molecular Imaging and Diagnostics Advanced Technologies for Global Research. “The combination of diagnostics and therapeutics is opening new doors in the fight against cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Through the application of molecular and cell biology to understanding disease, we can provide pharmaceutical companies with more advanced tools to develop more optimal drug therapies for cancer patients.”

The imaging technology GE provides will help Lilly get to trials earlier, specifically for two drugs the pharmaceutical company is working on – these include the current development of a drug for large cell lymphoma and for beta receptors.

“Our collaboration with GE complements Lilly’s research and development strategy of tailored therapeutics, or in other words, finding the right dose of the right medication at the right time for patients. Through our collaboration with GE Healthcare and GE Global Research, we hope to identify biomarkers for two of our targeted cancer therapeutic agents by examining patient tissues in order to determine which patients are most likely to respond to the medications and just as importantly which are not,” said Dr. Richard Gaynor, M.D., vice president, cancer research and global oncology platform for Eli Lilly and Company.

For more information: www.ge.com/research, www.gehealthcare.com and www.lilly.com

Related Content

Wearable monitors create patient generated health data, PGHD, that can help prevent acute care episodes in heart failure.

Wearable monitoring devices may offer a new tool to help prevent acute care episodes in heart failure.

Feature | Heart Failure| July 25, 2017 | Lola Koktysh
Despite their best efforts, many patients tend to develop heart failure after an acute event (e.g., a heart attack or
Left Atrial Pressure Monitor Offers New Hope for Heart Failure Patients
News | Heart Failure| July 14, 2017
A review appearing in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) discusses current...
monitoring a heart failure patient's chest fluid buildup with remote monitoring using the SensiVest

A heart failure patient wearing the SensiVest remote monitoring system for a two-minute a day assessment. 

News | Heart Failure| July 13, 2017
July 13, 2017 — About 5.7 million adults in the U.S.
Sponsored Content | Videos | Heart Failure| July 13, 2017
William Abraham, M.D., director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medica
Ohio State Investigating High-Tech Vest for At-Home Heart Failure Management
News | Heart Failure| June 28, 2017
Doctors at The Ohio State University Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital are testing a high-tech vest that measures fluid...
First Canadian Patient Implanted With CardioMEMS Heart Failure Sensor
News | Heart Failure| June 23, 2017
In a Canadian first, a medical team has implanted the wireless CardioMEMS HF device inside a heart failure patient. The...
Northwell Health Partners With Peerbridge Health on Remote Patient Monitoring
News | Wearable Sensors| June 01, 2017
Northwell Health recently announced a new partnership agreement with Peerbridge Health Inc., to explore the future of...
Sponsored Content | Videos | EP Lab| May 26, 2017
DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new electrophysiology (EP) technology at the 201
Consumers Warned About Accuracy of Heart Rate Apps in New Study
News | Mobile Devices| May 22, 2017
May 22, 2017 — Consumers are being warned about the accuracy of heart rate apps after a study found huge variability
Acarix, CADScor System, coronary artery disease detection, clinical study, ACC.17
News | Patient Monitors| March 30, 2017
Acarix AB recently announced the results from a new multi-center trial of its handheld CADScor System for non-invasive...
Overlay Init