News | Cardiovascular Clinical Studies | July 15, 2022

Molecular Heart Mapping and Cripsr Technology Create New Possibilities for Health Science

MMRI Scientist Dr. Nathan Tucker co-authors groundbreaking study with team from The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Bayer AG
 

MMRI Scientist Dr. Nathan Tucker co-authors groundbreaking study with team from The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Bayer AG

Image courtesy of MMRI


July 15, 2022 — Imagine, if scientists had a map of the heart, so granular in its accuracy that it even profiled details of the heart at the cellular level. What if we could zoom in even further, via single nucleus profiling, to peer inside the heart with a molecular view? Imagine the incredible possibilities of such a detailed map: With this knowledge, doctors will be better able to diagnose and treat diseases of the heart and cardiovascular system.    

This is precisely what a team of 19 scientists are determined to learn, in a new peer-reviewed study published in the science journal, Nature. The study, titled, “Single-nucleus profiling of human dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy,” identified molecular alterations in failing hearts at single-cell resolution, by performing single-nucleus RNA sequencing of nearly 600,000 nuclei. This is truly a story of how a “small view” can have “big possibilities.”   

The team was led by Patrick T. Ellinor, MD, PhD an Institute Member at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and a cardiologist in the Demoulas Center for Cardiac Arrhythmias at the Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center. Dr. Ellinor’s team included scientists from the Precision Cardiology Lab (PCL) of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Bayer, AG and MMRI.    

Dr. Nathan Tucker of Masonic Medical Research Institute was a driving force behind the initiation of the study when he was at Broad, and he continued to contribute to the study from his lab in Utica, New York. “We often think of hearts solely as muscles, but they are actually a complex mixture of cells that need to work together in order to perform its function as a pump,” said Dr. Tucker, regarding the new study. “In the past, we have not been able to look at these other critical components, but through revolutionary technology such as we use here, our ability to accurately examine these other cells is unlocked. In this study, using this technology and a series of human tissue samples, we identified novel state transitions in end stage heart failure at single cell resolution. It is our hope to use these new targets as the basis for therapeutic development in the future.”  

The ground-breaking effort builds upon Dr. Tucker’s already extensive work on heart mapping. In 2020, Dr. Tucker led a team to create a cell map of the human heart, the most comprehensive to date, stating, “Understanding of human cardiac biology at this resolution was not possible just a few years ago."  

For more information: www.MMRI.edu 


Related Content

News | Heart Failure

January 25, 2023 — Adults living in rural areas of the United States have a 19% higher risk of developing heart failure ...

Home January 25, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 24, 2023 — Leakage of the mitral valve due to degenerative prolapse is a common condition known as primary ...

Home January 24, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 18, 2023 — Phone calls from a nurse may improve survival for patients treated for heart failure, according to a ...

Home January 18, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 16, 2023 — On any given Tuesday, you will find Brian C. Jensen, MD, cardiologist and physician-scientist ...

Home January 16, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 13, 2023 — A change to Medicare policy surrounding heart transplant may lead to increased inequities in access ...

Home January 13, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

January 9, 2023 — When we were little, our parents told us to take our vitamins so we could grow big and strong. Now ...

Home January 09, 2023
Home
News | Heart Failure

December 29, 2022 — Anthracyclines are a class of chemotherapies effective in treating many forms of cancer, including ...

Home December 29, 2022
Home
News | Heart Failure

December 22, 2022 — Using machine learning and clinical data from electronic health records, researchers at the Icahn ...

Home December 22, 2022
Home
News | Heart Failure

December 16, 2022 — For the longest time, clinicians have treated cardiovascular disease by focusing on diabetes and ...

Home December 16, 2022
Home
News | Heart Failure

December 15, 2022 — Soon after cholesterol and fat start depositing on the lining of the blood vessels that supply your ...

Home December 15, 2022
Home
Subscribe Now