News | September 10, 2020

Optimax Nitride-oxide Coated Stent Superior to Synergy Drug-eluting Stent in TIDES-ACS Trial

The Opimax TiNO bio-active coated stent made by Hexacath.

The Opimax TiNO bio-active coated stent made by Hexacath.

September 5, 2020 – The TIDES-ACS Randomized Controlled Trial results were published end of July 2020 confirming the superior safety and sustained non-inferior efficacy of the Hexacath Bio-Active Stent technology at 18 months follow up versus a market leading drug-eluting stent.

Conducted in 12 international sites, this study randomized 1,491 ACS patients (2:1) to receive either TiNO bio-active coated stent (Opimax, Hexacath, Paris, France) versus Everolimus pharmacologically active stent (Synergy, Boston Scientific) in ACS patients.

The co-primary safety endpoint (a composite of cardiac death, re-infarction and major bleeding) occurred in 3.7% of patients receiving TiNO-coated stents versus 7.8% of those receiving EES (HR 0.64 [95% CI 0.51 – 0.80] p=0.001) demonstrating the superiority of the TiNO bio-active stent.

Individual cardiac safety events components at 18 months were cardiac death (0.6% versus 2.6%; HR 0.49 [95% CI 0.36 – 0.67], p=0.002), non-fatal MI (2.2% versus 5.0%; HR 0.62 [95% CI 0.47 – 0.82], p=0.007) and major bleeding (1.4% versus 2.4%; HR 0.73 [95% CI 0.48 – 1.11], p=0.209). Definite or probable stent thrombosis occurred in 1.1% with Opimax versus 3.0% with Synergy (HR 0.58 [95% CI 0.41 – 0.81], p=0.012). Interestingly, ischemia-driven TLR difference was not significant between both groups (5.8% versus 4.4%; HR 1.22 [95% CI 0.85 – 1.75], p=0.274).

"At 18 months post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the TIDES-ACS results reveal that the Optimax nitride-oxide coated stent is superior in patients with acute coronary syndrome compared to one of the top drug-eluting stents (Synergy) used in current interventional cardiology," said cardiologist Pasi Karjalainen, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

The co-primary non-inferiority endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): a composite of cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 12 months. The co-primary endpoint was met at 12 months, as MACE occurred in 6.3% with Opimax versus 7% with Synergy (HR 0.93 [95% CI 0.71 – 1.22] p for non-inferiority <0.001, p for superiority=0.66). The 18 months published results demonstrated the sustained efficacy in terms of efficacy of the TiNO bio-active stent technology as the rate of MACE was 7.2% with Opimax versus 8.8% with Synergy (HR 0.87 [95% CI 0.68 – 1.11], p=0.304).

"The TIDES-ACS results show that the Opimax nitride-oxide coated stent is non-inferior (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome compared to one of the best-in-class drug-eluting stents (Synergy) used in current interventional cardiology," said cardiologist Pim Tonino, Heart Center Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

In conclusion, in patients with ACS, cobalt-chromium based TiNO coated stents were non-inferior to platinum-chromium–based biodegradable polymer EES for major cardiac events at 12 and 18 months and were superior for the co-primary safety endpoint a composite of cardiac death, MI, and major bleeding at 18 months follow up without compromising the TLR rate (p=0.274).

For more information: www.hexacath.com
 

Related TiNO Coated Stent Content:

Titanium-Nitride-Oxide Stent Superior to Bioabsorbable Drug-Carrier DES in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients (EuroPCR 2018)

Titan Nitride Oxide Coated Stent is Noninferior to Synergy Stent (ESC 2017)
 

 

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