News | June 08, 2012

Philips Demonstrates Innovations in Nuclear Imaging With Applications for IntelliSpace Portal

June 8, 2012 — At this year’s SNM Annual Meeting, June 9-13, Philips Healthcare is highlighting its portfolio of nuclear medicine (NM) applications for IntelliSpace Portal, adding to its existing portfolio of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and multimodality applications. The full suite of NM applications will now offer comprehensive processing and review capabilities at a level normally reserved exclusively for dedicated NM workstations. The company will also showcase solutions designed to increase diagnostic confidence, enhance patient comfort, augment physician confidence, simplify clinical workflow and reduce lifecycle costs. 

“The nuclear medicine applications portfolio for the IntelliSpace Portal is designed to help nuclear medicine professionals improve their workflow and evaluate a patient’s progress,” said Jay Mazelsky, senior vice president and general manager, Philips Computed Tomography and Nuclear Medicine. “As a leader in nuclear medicine, Philips strives to provide solutions for our customers that improve collaboration in order to provide enhanced care for patients.”   

The NM applications portfolio for IntelliSpace Portal now allows NM technologists and physicians to process, review and analyze images from single photo emission computed tomography (SPECT), SPECT/CT, PET/CT and PET/MR, and then share images and findings with referring physicians using advanced collaboration tools. The clinical applications on IntelliSpace Portal can be accessed from virtually any networked computer – allowing clinicians the flexibility to collaboratively assess results at the hospital or remotely. 

“The IntelliSpace Portal nuclear medicine features have drastically changed the way we treat patients,” said Janusz Kikut, M.D., director of nuclear medicine and PET/CT, Fletcher Allen Healthcare, Burlington, Vt. “The features now allow us to better monitor change in disease status using the nuclear medicine imaging modalities that are often important to diagnosis. And, since we can access IntelliSpace Portal away from our campus, we’ve been able to improve our workflow with radiologists and seamlessly communicate the nuclear medicine results to referring physicians.”

Since the IntelliSpace Portal is built on a scalable server-client platform, it also offers the flexibility to efficiently add concurrent users as well as new clinical applications. This virtually eliminates the need for costly and time-consuming upgrades across multiple workstations. The IntelliSpace Portal can also interface with Philips or non-Philips picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), providing direct access to the comprehensive suite of NM review and processing applications.

Key NM application features include:

  • NM Review: A comprehensive and integrated review application for all types of NM and fused data, e.g., planar (dynamic, static, gated), SPECT (includes gated SPECT), SPECT/CT, PET/CT, PET/MR
  • NM Processing Application Suite: A comprehensive suite of organ-specific applications
  • Astonish Reconstruction: Boost departmental efficiency with cardiac imaging in half the time
  • Multimodality Tumor Tracking: Supports side-by-side comparisons of serial CT, MR and PET studies in order to assess the effectiveness of cancer treatment
  • Prefetch: Determines studies that need to be compared to previous scans and makes them available on Portal for review and comparison
  • Collaboration Viewer: Allows for fast and efficient processing of SPECT, SPECT/CT and PET/CT images along with collaboration between medical specialists and referrals

Philips is a leader in nuclear medicine imaging and delivers advanced solutions that meet the challenges clinicians often face. In addition to IntelliSpace Portal, Philips will also feature:

  • Ingenuity TF PET/MR: Philips’ first commercially available whole-body positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging system which Philips began marketing in the United States in November 2011
  • TruFlight Select PET/CT: Philips’ first economical PET/CT system equipped with its premium time-of-flight (TOF) technology, Astonish TF. Astonish TF is designed to enhance image quality by reducing image artifacts to help clinicians detect and locate lesions, increase diagnostic confidence and preserve healthy tissue during treatment
  • BrightView XCT with Full Iterative Technology (FIT): FIT for SPECT and CT uses advanced algorithms for exceptional images  

For more information:

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