News | May 08, 2009

Positron Systems, ISU to Produce Nuclear Medicine Isotope

May 8, 2009 - Positron Systems Inc. signed a Letter of Intent with Idaho State University (ISU) that will set the stage in a public/private partnership for the production and distribution of molybdenum-99 (99Mo), a widely used isotope in nuclear medicine.

The U.S. supply of 99Mo is not secure due to its reliance on a foreign supplier and safety concerns arising from the nuclear reactor-based production method currently employed by all current suppliers. Scientists at ISU’s Idaho Accelerator Center have developed a novel, proprietary method to produce 99Mo and are currently engaged in additional 99Mo research.
Worldwide production and sale of 99Mo is estimated to be a multi-billion a year industry.

“Idaho State University is on a trajectory to become a national leader in medical isotope research and development,” said ISU Vice President for Research, Dr. Pam Crowell. “We are excited to work toward a partnership with Positron Systems, an Idaho-based company, to help deliver vital medical products to the U.S.”

T. Erik Oaas, Chairman of Positron Systems, said, “Working side-by-side with ISU, we intend to replace the foreign supply of 99Mo in the U. S. with a product produced here in Idaho.” Positron Systems has facilities in Boise and Pocatello, Idaho.

ISU recently received nearly $1 million in federal appropriation to further their 99Mo research efforts.

For more information: www.positronsystems.com and www.isu.edu

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