Videos | Intravascular Imaging | September 26, 2018

VIDEO: Near Infrared Spectroscopy Detects, Aids Risk Assessment of Vulnerable Plaques

Ron Waksman, M.D., associate director of the division of cardiology and director of cardiovascular research and advanced education, Medstar Heart Institute, explains details of the late-breaking LRP (Lipid Rich Plaque) Trial at the 2018 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference. The trial used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to identify vulnerable plaques and track them over time to determine the accuracy of the risk assessment. He said this may be a paradigm shift for interventional cardiology, being able to identify high-risk lesions before they cause a heart attack.

Read the article on the LRP Study reults.

Learn more about the LRP study in another VIDEO with Waksman at ACC 2018.

Find more news and video from TCT.

 

 

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Recent Videos View all 429 items

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are starting to be adopted for physician training, patient education about their planned procedures, treatment planning and it is expected to be used as a procedure guidance tool in the near future. This example of AR displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meetingwas among the most innovative because it allows users to "feel" the 3-D hologram of the heart. Developed by the company SoftServe., the “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress technology allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart and get a touch sensation when they reach into the virtual tissue. A pad below the image is composed of dozens of ultrasound transducers that emit sound waves in the shape of the heart so users feel touch sensations when interacting with the virtual tissue.

Read the article "Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding,"

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

ECG | March 05, 2019

This is a quick demo of the Schiller Cardiovit FT-1 electrocardiograph (ECG) system displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. It has a 3-D rendering of a patient showing where each lead needs to be placed. The user can rotate the images on the touch screen to see where the leads go and can easily identify where any issues are when the system automatically alerts them about misplaced leads. The goal is to improve and speed ECGs using a better form of visualization than the traditional black and white 2-D pictures. The system changes the lead place placements of the body rending based on the type of exam being performed using a drop down menu.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Wearables | February 28, 2019

Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Israel,  discusses his center's use of wearable devices to manage a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. He spoke on the topic at 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.   

Sheba Medical Center in Israel has adopted an app that interfaces with various wearables and Bluetooth-enabled patient monitoring devices to create remote cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure programs. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. The app is able to transfer device data to an EMR so progress and tasks assigned to patients can be monitored without the need for them to come into the hospital for sessions. Klempfner recently wrote a paper on this topic

Watch the related VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Wearables | February 28, 2019

How wearable devices will play a role in healthcare was a big topic at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The biggest question is how to attached the data from consumer devices into a usable format for clinicians that interfaces with the electronic medical record (EMR). A good example of how wearables are being integrated in clinical care was demonstrated by the company Datos. It offers software that can integrate data from a wide variety of wearable devices from several makers into a mobile app, It can transfer the information to an EMR. The app also offers two way communication between the patient and the doctor’s office. It can prompt patients with a list of things they need to do each day to reach physician specified goals and displays analytics on a patient’s health data, including charts and graphs.

The system is used by Sheba Medical Center in Israel for a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. Watch the VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — an interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center.
 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Sponsored Videos View all 39 items

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | December 13, 2018

Michael Amponsah, M.D., FACC, an interventional cardiologist at Mohawk Valley Health System, shares a case of Impella CP for a non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patient who presented in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

The patient, a 51-year-old male, was diagnosed with NYHA Class III non-ischemic systolic heart failure with an ejection fraction of 20 percent and an ICD. He presented to the emergency department with ICD shocks and his hemodynamics declined over a 12 hour period and blood work showed a 20 percent decline in kidney function. Amponsah placed a right heart cath and performed an echocardiogram showing LV dysfunction. The team decided to place an Impella CP in the cath lab to support the patient’s heart. This was effective in unloading the LV and organ perfusion. This also provided the team with time to transfer the patient to another facility.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

Cath Lab | November 15, 2018

Navin Kapur, M.D., discusses the results of the FDA STEMI Door-to-Unloading (DTU) safety and feasibility randomized controlled trial, presented as a late-breaking study at the 2018 American Heart Association meeting. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Cath Lab | October 24, 2018

Michael Flaherty, M.D., discusses a study published in Circulation Research which finds that use of hemodynamic support with the Impella 2.5 heart pump during high-risk PCI can reduce the risk of AKI even when those patients had pre-existing kidney disease and a low ejection fraction. For more information: http://bit.ly/2Pfaqxh

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.

 

Cath Lab | September 19, 2018

William O’Neill, M.D., outlines his recent clinical publication of AMICS patients from the Impella Quality (IQ) database. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com.

Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2018

Organizations who are embarking on an enterprise imaging journey share many of the same questions and concerns regarding how to best optimize workflow across providers, departments and facilities; which technologies will provide the best fit for achieving the future vision; and how to maximize value and accelerate return on investment by driving adoption and improving satisfaction among providers and healthcare consumers (patients).

We, Paragon Consulting Partners LLC (PCP Imaging), are a team of passionate healthcare professionals that bring over 100 years of collective clinical, technical and business leadership experience within the healthcare IT and imaging informatics industries. In this video we address the key challenges and considerations faced by organizations undertaking an Enterprise Imaging journey, and how a trusted partner can contribute valuable expertise and guidance that enable healthcare organizations and vendors of any size to successfully tackle even their most challenging enterprise imaging initiatives. For more information, visit pcpimaging.com.

Conference Videos View all 325 items

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are starting to be adopted for physician training, patient education about their planned procedures, treatment planning and it is expected to be used as a procedure guidance tool in the near future. This example of AR displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meetingwas among the most innovative because it allows users to "feel" the 3-D hologram of the heart. Developed by the company SoftServe., the “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress technology allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart and get a touch sensation when they reach into the virtual tissue. A pad below the image is composed of dozens of ultrasound transducers that emit sound waves in the shape of the heart so users feel touch sensations when interacting with the virtual tissue.

Read the article "Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding,"

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

ECG | March 05, 2019

This is a quick demo of the Schiller Cardiovit FT-1 electrocardiograph (ECG) system displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. It has a 3-D rendering of a patient showing where each lead needs to be placed. The user can rotate the images on the touch screen to see where the leads go and can easily identify where any issues are when the system automatically alerts them about misplaced leads. The goal is to improve and speed ECGs using a better form of visualization than the traditional black and white 2-D pictures. The system changes the lead place placements of the body rending based on the type of exam being performed using a drop down menu.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Wearables | February 28, 2019

Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Israel,  discusses his center's use of wearable devices to manage a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. He spoke on the topic at 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.   

Sheba Medical Center in Israel has adopted an app that interfaces with various wearables and Bluetooth-enabled patient monitoring devices to create remote cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure programs. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. The app is able to transfer device data to an EMR so progress and tasks assigned to patients can be monitored without the need for them to come into the hospital for sessions. Klempfner recently wrote a paper on this topic

Watch the related VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Wearables | February 28, 2019

How wearable devices will play a role in healthcare was a big topic at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The biggest question is how to attached the data from consumer devices into a usable format for clinicians that interfaces with the electronic medical record (EMR). A good example of how wearables are being integrated in clinical care was demonstrated by the company Datos. It offers software that can integrate data from a wide variety of wearable devices from several makers into a mobile app, It can transfer the information to an EMR. The app also offers two way communication between the patient and the doctor’s office. It can prompt patients with a list of things they need to do each day to reach physician specified goals and displays analytics on a patient’s health data, including charts and graphs.

The system is used by Sheba Medical Center in Israel for a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. Watch the VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — an interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center.
 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Enterprise Imaging | February 27, 2019

Steve Holloway, principal analyst and company director for the healthcare market research firm Signify Research, explains the key trends he is seeing in enterprise imaging systems. He spoke to ITN at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.  

Additional HIMSS 2019 coverage.

Look through a photo gallery of new technologies highlighted at HIMSS 2019.

Watch the RSNA 2018 VIDEO: Technology Report — Enterprise Imaging

Cath Lab View all 204 items

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

Angiography | February 08, 2019

This is an example of an arterial venous malformation (AVM) in the brain imaged on a Canon Alphenix Alpha angiography system. It shjows a contrast injection highlighting the vessels, which have been color coded to show the position of the veins and arteries involved in this vascular defect. 

Read more about advances in angiography imaging systems. 

Heart Valve Technology | January 25, 2019

Joe Cleveland, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery, at the University of Colorado Hospital, offers a cardiac surgeon's perspective as part of the heart team for reviewing patient cases for transcatheter mitral and aortic interventions. He spoke about evaluating patients for MitraClip, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. He helps determine if a patient will benefit more from a transcatheter or surgical procedure. Cleveland also explains the impact of these transcatheter procedures on surgical volumes.

Watch the VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado.
 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | January 08, 2019

Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, University of Colorado Hospital, explains why advanced imaging techniques are required to tackle complex transcatheter procedures and structural heart interventions. The University of Colorado Hospital helped develop the Philips EchoNavigator live image fusion technology, and this video offers an overview of how it came to be and where the technology is going.

Watch the related VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado, which shows examples of the navigation technology is use during a MitraClip procedure. 

 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart Occluders | January 07, 2019

Karen Orjuela, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at the University of Colorado Stroke and Brain Aneurysm Center, explains the heart-brain team approach to screening cryptogenic stroke patients for transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure. 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

Related PFO Closure Content:

VIDEO: How Transcatheter PFO Closure Can Reduce Cryptogenic Stroke — Interview with 
John Rhodes, M.D., on the REDUCE PFO Trial

PFO Closure Shows Positive Results from REDUCE Clinical Study

VIDEO: PFO Closure Found Beneficial for Cryptogenic Stroke — Presentation of RESPECT Trial results by John Carroll,  M.D.

PFO Closure May Improve Outcomes Over Medical Therapy in Cryptogenic Stroke: Results of the RESPECT Trial
 

 

 

 

Structural Heart | January 07, 2019

John Carroll, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, and Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, explain the development of the transcatheter mitral valve repair program at the University of Colorado Hospital. The video include footage during a MitraClip procedure. 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

Cardiac Imaging View all 190 items

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are starting to be adopted for physician training, patient education about their planned procedures, treatment planning and it is expected to be used as a procedure guidance tool in the near future. This example of AR displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meetingwas among the most innovative because it allows users to "feel" the 3-D hologram of the heart. Developed by the company SoftServe., the “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress technology allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart and get a touch sensation when they reach into the virtual tissue. A pad below the image is composed of dozens of ultrasound transducers that emit sound waves in the shape of the heart so users feel touch sensations when interacting with the virtual tissue.

Read the article "Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding,"

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Enterprise Imaging | February 27, 2019

Steve Holloway, principal analyst and company director for the healthcare market research firm Signify Research, explains the key trends he is seeing in enterprise imaging systems. He spoke to ITN at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.  

Additional HIMSS 2019 coverage.

Look through a photo gallery of new technologies highlighted at HIMSS 2019.

Watch the RSNA 2018 VIDEO: Technology Report — Enterprise Imaging

Angiography | February 08, 2019

This is an example of an arterial venous malformation (AVM) in the brain imaged on a Canon Alphenix Alpha angiography system. It shjows a contrast injection highlighting the vessels, which have been color coded to show the position of the veins and arteries involved in this vascular defect. 

Read more about advances in angiography imaging systems. 

Cath Lab Navigation Aids | January 08, 2019

Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, University of Colorado Hospital, explains why advanced imaging techniques are required to tackle complex transcatheter procedures and structural heart interventions. The University of Colorado Hospital helped develop the Philips EchoNavigator live image fusion technology, and this video offers an overview of how it came to be and where the technology is going.

Watch the related VIDEO: Evolution of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair at the University of Colorado, which shows examples of the navigation technology is use during a MitraClip procedure. 

 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

 

 

Structural Heart | January 07, 2019

John Carroll, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, and Robert Quaife, M.D., director of advanced cardiac imaging, explain the development of the transcatheter mitral valve repair program at the University of Colorado Hospital. The video include footage during a MitraClip procedure. 

Additional videos and coverage of the University of Colorado Hospital

Chronic Total Occlusion (CTO) | January 03, 2019

Interview with John Messenger, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of the cardiac cath labs and director of the cardiovascular ICU/stepdown unit, and Kevin Rogers, M.D., director of vascular medicine at the University of Colorado Hospital. They explain the trend toward more complex procedures, including chronic total occlusions (CTOs) and complex high-risk indicated procedure (CHIP) patients. They explain how they minimize X-ray and contrast dose during these longer procedures, the tools they use to perform the procedures and offer advice for centers expanding into complex PCI.

Watch a VIDEO walk through of this cath lab at the University of Colorado Hospital.
 

 

Find more content from the University of Colorado Hospital.

 

 

Cath Lab | January 03, 2019

This is a walk through inside one of the cardiac hybrid cath labs at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Colorado. It is centered around a bi-plane Philips AlluraClarity angiography system. In the lab are two echo systems. There is a Philips Epiq system for transesophageal echo (TEE) and to enable the EchoNavigator live echo/fluoro fusion imaging. There also is a Siemens ultrasound system to enable use of intra-cardiac echo (ICE).

For hemodynamic support there is both an Abiomed Impella console and a Teleflex intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) console. The lab is equipped with an Acist automated contrast Injector. Also note the radial access boards. There are three rolling radiation shields in addition to a boom mounted Mavig shield. Anethesia is used in MitraClip procedures, which the lab is being prepped for in this video. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital

Find more articles and videos on the University of Colorado Hospital

 

Cardiac Diagnostics View all 46 items

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

ECG | March 05, 2019

This is a quick demo of the Schiller Cardiovit FT-1 electrocardiograph (ECG) system displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. It has a 3-D rendering of a patient showing where each lead needs to be placed. The user can rotate the images on the touch screen to see where the leads go and can easily identify where any issues are when the system automatically alerts them about misplaced leads. The goal is to improve and speed ECGs using a better form of visualization than the traditional black and white 2-D pictures. The system changes the lead place placements of the body rending based on the type of exam being performed using a drop down menu.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Wearables | February 28, 2019

Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Israel,  discusses his center's use of wearable devices to manage a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. He spoke on the topic at 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.   

Sheba Medical Center in Israel has adopted an app that interfaces with various wearables and Bluetooth-enabled patient monitoring devices to create remote cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure programs. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. The app is able to transfer device data to an EMR so progress and tasks assigned to patients can be monitored without the need for them to come into the hospital for sessions. Klempfner recently wrote a paper on this topic

Watch the related VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Wearables | February 28, 2019

How wearable devices will play a role in healthcare was a big topic at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The biggest question is how to attached the data from consumer devices into a usable format for clinicians that interfaces with the electronic medical record (EMR). A good example of how wearables are being integrated in clinical care was demonstrated by the company Datos. It offers software that can integrate data from a wide variety of wearable devices from several makers into a mobile app, It can transfer the information to an EMR. The app also offers two way communication between the patient and the doctor’s office. It can prompt patients with a list of things they need to do each day to reach physician specified goals and displays analytics on a patient’s health data, including charts and graphs.

The system is used by Sheba Medical Center in Israel for a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. Watch the VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — an interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center.
 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Heart Failure | November 15, 2018

James Januzzi, M.D., Hutter Family Professor at Harvard Medical School and a cardiologist at Mass General Hospital,, Boston, spoke at the 2018 American Heart Association (AHA) meeting about blood biomarkers that can aid in assessing reverse remodeling in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). 

Januzzi mentions the use of high sensitivity troponin in this video. Watch a VIDEO interview with Januzzi on his research with high sensitivity troponin.

 

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | November 14, 2018

Matthew Budoff, M.D., professor of medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, spoke at the 2018 American Heart Association (AHA) meeting on the new AHA guidelines for cholesterol, including the use of computed tomography (CT) calcium scoring scans to assess patient risk. Budoff has been involved in several of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) trials that supported the new recommendation.

Read the related article "CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor Assessment."

 

 

EP Lab View all 50 items

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

EP Lab | January 03, 2019

This is a quick video tour of one of the dedicated electrophysiology (EP) labs at the University of Colorado Hospital. The room is built around a Siemens Artis Q.zen bi-plane angiography system. The system allows low radiation fluoro imaging, which reduced exposure to both patients and operators during long EP ablation procedures. 

Equipment in stock in this lab includes the Medtronic Artic Front cryoablation balloon.

Watch the VIDEO: Cryoballoon Ablation Best Practice Guidelines, an interview with Wilber Su, M.D.

Watch the related VIDEO: Cath Lab Walk Through at the University of Colorado Hospital
 

Find more articles and videos on the University of Colorado Hospital

EP Lab | November 15, 2018

Wilber Su, M.D., chief of cardiac electrophysiology, Banner University Medical Center, Phoenix, and clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Arizona, explains the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) best practices document on cryoballoon ablation. He led the development of that document. He spoke at the 2018 American Heart Association (AHA) meeting.

Read the HRS "Best practice guide for cryoballoon ablation in atrial fibrillation: The compilation experience of more than 3,000 procedures."

Read the related article "New Technologies to Improve Atrial Fibrillation Ablation."

 

 

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | October 01, 2018

Ashish Pershad, M.D., medical director, structural heart program, Banner University Medical Heart Institute, Phoenix, explains the difference he found between the FDA cleared Watchman left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder and the Abbott Amplatzer Amulet device now in U.S. trials. He spoke on these differences at the 2018 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference. 

Watch the VIDEO: New Data on LAA Occlusion From the PREVAIL and PROTECT Trials — Interview with Vivek Reddy, M.D.

Read the article "Occluding the Left Atrial Appendage (LAA)."

#TCT2018

Sudden Cardiac Arrest | July 05, 2018

Malissa Wood, M.D., co-director of the Corrigan Women’s Heart Health Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the the recent debate and data for screening all student athletes for SCA during the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2018 meeting. 

Related Links:
American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Position Statement Evaluates Role of ECG in Athletic Cardiovascular Screening

Cardiac Ultrasound Studies Evaluate Impact of Exercise on Athletes' Hearts

Tackling Cardiovascular Health Risks in College Football Players

 

Stroke | May 09, 2018

A new clinical trial at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is examining an implanted device that uses vagus nerve stimulation to help stroke patients regain motor function. The Vivistim device is similar to a pacemaker, which uses leads to electrically stimulate the brain. 

Read the article "New Therapy Rewires the Brain to Improve Stoke Recovery."
 

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest | March 14, 2018

The Zoll LifeVest is a temporary, wearable defibrillator designed as a safety net for patients, especially those being evaluated for a permanent implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The Vest Prevention of Early Sudden Death Trial (VEST), presented at ACC 2018, was the first randomized, controlled, multi-center trial of the wearable cardioverter defibrillator. It looked to see if this device could effectively reduce sudden death in patients who had recently suffered a heart attack and had reduced heart function. Read more about the VEST Trial. 

Information Technology View all 114 items

Wearables | March 08, 2019

Karl Poterack, M.D., medical director, applied clinical informatics, Mayo Clinic, explains the role wearable devices will play in healthcare. He presented in several sessions at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.

Poterack said there is a brewing tsunami of data in wearable technologies that healthcare systems will have to figure out how to integrate in the coming years. He said the key issue with wearable data is that there needs to be outcomes data showing the value of how many steps a patient accumulates, changes in heart rate over time, or blood pressure changes in patients with specific aliments. Without this , he said there is limited value in the information. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are starting to be adopted for physician training, patient education about their planned procedures, treatment planning and it is expected to be used as a procedure guidance tool in the near future. This example of AR displayed at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meetingwas among the most innovative because it allows users to "feel" the 3-D hologram of the heart. Developed by the company SoftServe., the “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress technology allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart and get a touch sensation when they reach into the virtual tissue. A pad below the image is composed of dozens of ultrasound transducers that emit sound waves in the shape of the heart so users feel touch sensations when interacting with the virtual tissue.

Read the article "Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding,"

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Artificial Intelligence | March 04, 2019

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare. 

He said AI will play a big roll in imaging assessments of adult congenital heart disease to help relieve the burden on the small number of congenital cardiologists. 

Chang also explained there is a tsunami of data about to wash over healthcare as wearable devices begin to be integrated into patient care. AI will play a key role in sorting through all this data by monitoring the information to identify trends or disease markers and alert clinicians and the patient.

He was a keynote speaker at HIMSS19 with his session "Synergies Between Man and Machine — Future AI apps can be directed to help mitigate physician burnout by decreasing the EHR burden, improving medical education, and automating quality improvement."

Read the article 6 Key Health Information Technology Trends at HIMSS 2019.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Wearables | February 28, 2019

Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Israel,  discusses his center's use of wearable devices to manage a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. He spoke on the topic at 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.   

Sheba Medical Center in Israel has adopted an app that interfaces with various wearables and Bluetooth-enabled patient monitoring devices to create remote cardiac rehabilitation and heart failure programs. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. The app is able to transfer device data to an EMR so progress and tasks assigned to patients can be monitored without the need for them to come into the hospital for sessions. Klempfner recently wrote a paper on this topic

Watch the related VIDEO: The Future of Wearables in Healthcare 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Wearables | February 28, 2019

How wearable devices will play a role in healthcare was a big topic at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The biggest question is how to attached the data from consumer devices into a usable format for clinicians that interfaces with the electronic medical record (EMR). A good example of how wearables are being integrated in clinical care was demonstrated by the company Datos. It offers software that can integrate data from a wide variety of wearable devices from several makers into a mobile app, It can transfer the information to an EMR. The app also offers two way communication between the patient and the doctor’s office. It can prompt patients with a list of things they need to do each day to reach physician specified goals and displays analytics on a patient’s health data, including charts and graphs.

The system is used by Sheba Medical Center in Israel for a remote cardiac rehabilitation program. It now remotely monitors hundreds of patients and does not require them to come to the hospital for sessions, which has helped increase patient satisfaction and aided in increasing physical activity compliance. Watch the VIDEO: Use of Wearable Medical Devices for Cardiac Rehabilitation — an interview with Robert Klempfner, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Prevention Institute, Sheba Medical Center.
 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

EP Lab | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient being developed to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. It was unveiled at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February by Siemens. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Enterprise Imaging | February 27, 2019

Steve Holloway, principal analyst and company director for the healthcare market research firm Signify Research, explains the key trends he is seeing in enterprise imaging systems. He spoke to ITN at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.  

Additional HIMSS 2019 coverage.

Look through a photo gallery of new technologies highlighted at HIMSS 2019.

Watch the RSNA 2018 VIDEO: Technology Report — Enterprise Imaging

Angiography | February 08, 2019

This is an example of an arterial venous malformation (AVM) in the brain imaged on a Canon Alphenix Alpha angiography system. It shjows a contrast injection highlighting the vessels, which have been color coded to show the position of the veins and arteries involved in this vascular defect. 

Read more about advances in angiography imaging systems. 

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