Feature | July 15, 2011| Mladen I. Vidovich, M.D., FACC, FSCAI

EuroPCR: Radial PCI Lowers STEMI Mortality at 30 Days and One Year

Swedish SCAAR Registry data were presented in May during the EuroPCR meeting in Paris. The 30-day ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) mortality was 4.4% in the femoral access group vs. 3.2% in the radial access group (adjusted odds ratio 0.57, p<0.01). The benefit of radial approach was present at one year as well (7.3% femoral vs. 6.2% radial mortality, adjusted OR 0.78, p=0.018).


These are contemporary data from 2005-2010, during which use of radial increased from 12 to 50%, while the use of bivalirudin increased and use of GP 2B/3A inhibitors decreased. The serious bleeding events occurred in 2.2% of patients in the femoral group and 1% in the radial group. Nonetheless, despite the well-recognized limitations present in a retrospective registry analysis, these findings are in line with the subgroup analysis from the RIVAL study. The SCAAR registry data certainly adds to the growing evidence supporting radial approach in high-risk PCI.

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