Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD)

This channel includes news and new technology innovations for ventricular assist devices (VAD). VADs are a type of mechanical hemodynamic support device that helps increase blood flow in people who have ventricles that are not work properly due to heart failure, cardiogenic shock, cardiomyopathy or myocardial infarction. Most often these devices support the left ventricle, so they are often referred to as left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). VADS come in two types, surgically implanted, usually as a bridge to heart transplant, and percutanenous catheter-based pumps used for temporary hemodynamic support. Examples of temporary percutaneous pumps include the Impella and TandemHeart devices.

 

News | August 08, 2012

Aug. 8, 2012 — The Berlin Heart Group said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted approval for its...

News | June 14, 2012

June 14, 2012 — Abiomed Inc. said today it received Health Canada approval to market the Impella cVAD (...

News | May 21, 2012

May 21, 2012 — Minnetronix announced the exclusive licensing rights of Penn State Research Foundation’s wireless...

News | April 23, 2012

April 23, 2012 - CircuLite Inc. announced that updated clinical data related to the Synergy miniature...

Technology | April 17, 2012

April 17, 2012 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a humanitarian use device (HUD)...

News | April 12, 2012

April 12, 2012 - Abiomed Inc., a provider of heart support technologies, announced it has received CE marking...

News | April 09, 2012

April 9, 2012 — Thoratec and the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA) announced a recent Class 1 recall of the...

Jordan Merecka (right), received a new heart Oct. 29, after 160 days with a Syncardia Total Artificial Heart.

News | March 05, 2012

March 5, 2012 — SynCardia Systems Inc., manufacturer of the world’s first and only U.S. Food and Drug Administration...

The Jarvik 2000 heart includes the blood pump inside the natural heart (white arrow), the internal cable (blue arrow), the behind-the-ear connector (green arrow) the belt worn controller (yellow arrow), the belt worn battery (grey arrow), and the external cables (black).

Feature | February 28, 2012

February 27, 2012 – Jarvik Heart Inc. announced conditional U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of its...

News | February 22, 2012

February 22, 2012 — HeartWare International Inc. announced that a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

News | February 16, 2012

February 16, 2012 — Few hospitals have as much experience with the Berlin Heart...

Symphony.

Symphony.

News | February 02, 2012

February 2, 2012 — Abiomed Inc. announced that initial clinical data from the safety study for Symphony was...

News | January 27, 2012

January 27, 2012 — A miniature, battery-free, wireless, cardiac implant being developed by a University of Michigan...

On Nov. 8, 2011, SynCardia Total Artificial Heart patient Jack Miller became the first politician in the United States to be elected to office without a human heart. On election day, he was able to man the polls and interact with voters using the Freedom portable driver to power his Total Artificial Heart.

Feature | March 19, 2012

Jack Miller, 62, is probably the only politician in America who smiles when people call him “heartless.” Four months...

News | January 11, 2012

January 11, 2012 — HeartWare International, Inc. and Dualis MedTech GmbH, a subsidiary of AVRA Surgical, Inc.,...

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