News | May 06, 2011

SCAI Releases First Report on Transradial Access for PCI

May 6, 2011 – As interventional cardiologists increasingly perform angiography or angioplasty and stent procedures via radial access versus femoral (groin or upper leg) access, it will be imperative to develop training and competency guidelines. This was according to the first report from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Intervention's (SCAI) Transradial Working Group released yesterday at the SCAI 2011 Scientific Sessions, and published in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. The report reviews issues such as patient selection and preparation, artery access, catheter and therapy selection, primary PCI, potential complications and training for intervention cardiologists performing procedures via radial access.

Radial access is common around the world, but still remains relatively unused in the United States. Recent research, including the RIVAL Trial presented at the 2011 American College of Cardiology (ACC) 60th Annual Scientific Sessions, has shown radial access is a safe and effective technique, can increase survival for heart attack patients and is often preferred by patients over femoral access. However, published guidelines for the procedure and training are not yet available.

"Data increasingly show that the radial technique, which many patients find more comfortable, is also safe and effective," said Ronald P. Caputo, M.D., FSCAI, the report's lead author and director of cardiac services, St. Joseph's Hospital in Syracuse, N.Y. "As this technique is used more frequently in the United States, we want to ensure it is used safely and appropriately."

The report recommends training focused on three levels of competency based on the individual interventional cardiologist's level of experience with simple and complex cases, including patients with challenging anatomy. The authors emphasize that interventional cardiology trainees should develop equal competency in both femoral and radial approaches, and guidelines should be developed to address best practices for safe use of the radial technique.

"To ensure patients receive the best possible care, we recommend developing training programs that provide interventional cardiologists with opportunities to learn and test their skills in the radial technique," said Jennifer A. Tremmel, M.D., M.S., FSCAI, report co-author and director of the transradial program at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, Calif.

As of 2009, only 4.5 percent of coronary procedures in the United States are performed transradially. The technique is more common in Europe and Asia/Australia, where 30 and 40 percent of procedures are performed via radial access, respectively.

SCAI's Transradial Working Group has developed a series of regional educational programs for interventional cardiologists to be trained in the use of radial access. The demand for these programs has been high, and SCAI plans to offer at least four programs nationwide in 2011.
The complete report, "Transradial Arterial Access for Coronary and Peripheral Procedures," may be accessed at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ccd.23052/pdf.

For more information: www.scai.org

Related Content

Radial access in the U.S. is now approaching 50 percent. Tranradial access also shows benefit for mortality and decreases in acute kidney injury (AKI).
Feature | Radial Access | February 14, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Transradial access for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the United States has grown rapidly over the past
News | Radial Access | December 30, 2019
December 30, 2019 — Merit Medical Systems Inc., a leading manufacturer of propri
The three sites most often used for distal radial artery access are the (1) anatomic snuffbox above the scaphoid (left), (2) adjacent to the snuffbox at the trapezium bone (center), and (3) the first intermetacarpal space (right). The author’s preference is either of the first two options, although good outcomes have been reported with use of the intermetacarpal space.

The three sites most often used for distal radial artery access are the (1) anatomic snuffbox above the scaphoid (left), (2) adjacent to the snuffbox at the trapezium bone (center), and (3) the first intermetacarpal space (right). The author’s preference is either of the first two options, although good outcomes have been reported with use of the intermetacarpal space.

Feature | Radial Access | November 21, 2019 | Enrique Flores, M.D., RPVI
Interest in distal radial artery access (DRA) is growing rapidly.
Videos | Radial Access | October 22, 2019
Sunil Rao, M.D., chief of cardiology, Durham VA Health System and a professor at Duke University, and Prashant Kaul, M....
Cordis Announces U.S. Launch of Radial 360 Portfolio
Technology | Radial Access | May 15, 2019
Cordis, a Cardinal Health company, recently announced the full U.S. launch of its Radial 360 portfolio, offering a...
Ferdinand Kiemeneij, M.D., explains the history of the transradial access during an interview with DAIC at TCT 2017.

Ferdinand Kiemeneij, M.D., explains the history of the transradial access during an interview with DAIC at TCT 2017.

Feature | Radial Access | February 22, 2018 | Dave Fornell
Interventional cardiology has witnessed a rapid and constant evolution in both techniques and device technology since
Videos | Radial Access | February 16, 2018
The father of transradial artery access,...
SCAI Launches TRAnsition for VALUE Radial Access Educational Initiative
News | Radial Access | November 13, 2017
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions recently announced the launch of TRAnsition for VALUE, a...