News | Stem Cell Therapies | January 17, 2018

Secant Introduces First Synthetic Regenerative Cardiovascular Graft for CABG

Artificial blood vessels offer replacement to harvesting patient’s veins for coronary bypass grafts

Secant Introduces First Synthetic Regenerative Cardiovascular Graft for CABG

January 17, 2018 — Secant Group, in partnership with its sister company SanaVita Medical, announced new technology to advance cardiovascular regenerative medicine with the development of a synthetic, small-bore vessel that encourages endogenous regeneration and new vessel formation. The technology is based on the company’s textile forming capabilities that can produce a hollow lumen construct infused with Secant’s proprietary Regenerez bioresorbable polymer technology. The new small-bore vessel supports the regeneration of new vascular tissue structures without the need for cell seeding or biologic growth promoters.

In situ vascular regeneration, along with the elastomeric and immunomodulatory properties of the synthetic vessel, could solve the problems of vascular harvesting and the non-resorbable synthetic graft compliance mismatching seen with the current technology available for surgeons today. These regenerative grafts will offer new benefits for coronary artery bypass surgery, peripheral vascular disease and renal disease treatments.

Secant has produced small-bore grafts with lumen diameters down to 500 μm, closely matching the range of human vessels. Jeff Robertson, president of Secant Group, explained that by combining Secant’s textile manufacturing and biomaterials capability, this small-bore graft would provide similar compliance as native vasculature, enabling a seamless connection between graft and vessel.

Devices that currently dominate the cardiovascular graft replacement market have numerous limitations including compliance mismatch, low patency rates, calcification, a risk of infection and lack of tissue regeneration capability. The Secant small-bore graft addresses many of these limitations. Early pre-clinical studies have confirmed that Regenerez grafts are non-thrombogenic, did not show occlusion and provide excellent suturability. Secant is continuing the development of small-bore grafts in collaboration with a leading heart and vascular research university. The company is currently looking for medical device partners to progress the technology through clinical trials and commercialization.

For more information: www.secant.com

 

Related Content

Keck School of Medicine Promotes Patient Diversity in Cardiac Surgery Clinical Trials
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | July 26, 2019
A highly competitive $4.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Heart, Lung and Blood...
Google Doodle Celebrates Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Pioneer René Favaloro
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | July 12, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Internet search engine giant Google unveiled a new Doodle on its homepage Friday, July 12, celebrating the life and...
Open Heart Surgery Outperforms Stents in Patients With Multivessel Disease
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | May 03, 2019
Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery may be the best treatment option for most patients with more than one...
SherpaPak Cardiac Transport System Cleared for Pediatric and Small Donor Hearts
Technology | Cardiovascular Surgery | February 01, 2019
Paragonix Technologies Inc. recently received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a design...
Transplanting Pig Hearts Into Humans One Step Closer. A pig heart, shown here, is very similar in size and anatomy to a human heart. For this reason, pigs are used extensively in pre-clinical animal testing for new implantable cardiovascular devices. If pig hearts could be used for human transplantation, it would greatly alleviate shortages of donor human hearts.

A pig heart, shown here, is very similar in size and anatomy to a human heart. For this reason, pigs are used extensively in pre-clinical animal testing for new implantable cardiovascular devices. If pig hearts could be used for human transplantation, it would greatly alleviate shortages of donor human hearts.

News | Cardiovascular Surgery | December 11, 2018
The scientific journal Nature recently published an article from Munich University Hospital which describes the long-...
Bilateral Artery Use Does Not Improve 10-Year CABG Outcomes
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | September 06, 2018
While it is firmly established that the use of one internal thoracic artery can improve life expectancy in coronary...
Mandatory Public Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Reporting Associated With Better Patient Outcomes
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | April 30, 2018
Mandatory public reporting of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) results in Massachusetts was associated with...
Gecko Biomedical Receives CE Mark Approval for Setalum Sealant
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | September 19, 2017
Gecko Biomedical announced it has received CE Mark approval for its Setalum Sealant, allowing the company to market its...
ClearFlow Inc. Announces Positive U.S. Clinical Trial Results
News | Cardiovascular Surgery | September 08, 2017
September 8, 2017 — ClearFlow Inc.
Overlay Init