Coronavirus (COVID-19)

This page contains medical information for clinicians on the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19, also called 2019-nCoV, and now clinically SARS‐CoV‐2). This section includes articles that pertain to clinicians and cardiologists on the virus, new technologies being deployed to fight the virus and clinical information from various sources. Here are direct links for medical professionals to COVID-19 resources from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Daily world-wide statistics on the coronavirus outbreak are available from the WHO Situations Reports. Here is the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) frequently asked questions and answers (FAQs) for healthcare providers regarding Medicare payment for laboratory tests and other services related to the COVID-19.

A cardiac MRI of athletes who had COVID-19 is seven times more effective in detecting inflammation of the heart than symptom-based testing, according to a study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine with 12 other Big Ten programs.

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Athletes With Clinical and Subclinical Myocarditis A-D, Athlete A with subclinical possible myocarditis was asymptomatic with normal electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram, and high-sensitivity troponin findings. A, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in basal-mid inferolateral wall in short axis view. B, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in the basal inferolateral wall in short axis view. C, Postcontrast steady state-free precession (SSFP) images showing contrast uptake in the basal-mid inferolateral wall in short axis view. D, LGE in the inferolateral wall in 3-chamber view. E-H, Athlete B with subclinical probable myocarditis was asymptomatic with normal ECG, normal echocardiogram, and elevated high-sensitivity troponin findings. E, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the anteroseptal wall in short axis view. F, LGE in the anteroseptal wall in 3-chamber view. G, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the anteroseptal wall in 3-chamber view. F, Postcontrast SSFP image showing pericardial effusion in short axis view. I-K, Athlete C with clinical myocarditis and chest pain, dyspnea, abnormal ECG, normal echocardiogram, and normal troponin findings. I, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the lateral wall short axis view. J, Postcontrast SSFP images showing contrast uptake in midlateral wall in short axis view. K, LGE in the epicardial midlateral wall in short axis view. L-N, Athlete D with clinical myocarditis, chest pain, abnormal ECG, echocardiogram, and troponin findings. L, T1 mapping showing elevated native T1 in midlateral wall in short axis view. M, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the midlateral wall in short axis view. N, LGE in the epicardial midlateral wall in short axis view. IR indicates inferior right view; IRP, inferior, right, posterior view; PLI, posterior, left, inferior view; SL, superior left view; SLA, superior, left, anterior view. Image courtesy of JAMA Cardiol. Published online May 27, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2021.2065

News | Cardiac Imaging | June 15, 2021
June 15, 2021 — A cardiac MRI of athletes who had COVID-19 is seven times more effective in detecting inflammation of...
Image from the announcement of the Neal award winner of best technical content for DAIC's coverage of COVID-10 related to cardiology at the Neal virtual award ceremony June 9.

Image from the announcement of the Neal award winner of best technical content for DAIC's coverage of COVID-10 related to cardiology at the Neal virtual award ceremony June 9.

Feature | Cardiovascular Business | June 10, 2021
June 10, 2021 — Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) magazine has won a prestigious Jesse H. Neal Award for...
Rates of burnout pre- and peak COVID-19 pandemic increased across all members of the cardiology care team and was particularly striking among cardiovascular team members, which researchers said may be because they were more likely at the bedside as patients were dying. Among all cardiovascular clinicians – cardiologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists and imaging technologists – half provided direct care to patients with COVID-19. #COVID19 #ACCCOVID

Rates of burnout pre- and peak COVID-19 pandemic increased across all members of the cardiology care team and was particularly striking among cardiovascular team members, which researchers said may be because they were more likely at the bedside as patients were dying. Among all cardiovascular clinicians – cardiologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists and imaging technologists – half provided direct care to patients with COVID-19, and yet one of five reported not having adequate personal protective equipment (PPE). Not surprisingly, the rate of burnout was higher in this group. Getty Images
 

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 07, 2021
June 7, 2021 — The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a significant toll on cardiovascular clinicians, many of whom provide...
U.S. positive COVID test case data for 2020 through June 3, 2021, It shows four clear waves of spikes in U.S. COVID cases. Most of these appeared to be partly fueled by people gathering during the July 4, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's, Valentine's Day, and easter holidays. Source: John Hopkins University

U.S. positive COVID test case data for 2020 through June 3, 2021, It shows four clear waves of spikes in U.S. COVID cases. Most of these appeared to be partly fueled by people gathering during the July 4, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's, Valentine's Day, and easter holidays. Source: Johns Hopkins University

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 04, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Vaccinations appear to to be helping reduce COVID-19 virus positive case numbers, and a review of the U.S. COVID...
MRI scan of heart damaged by COVID, which can cause myocarditis, infarction and/or ischemia. Blue means reduced blood flow, orange is good blood flow. In this figure the inferior part of the heart shows dark blue, so the myocardial blood flow is very reduced. The angiogram shows the coronary artery which supplies the blood to this part of the heart is occluded. The three colored MRI images show different slices of the heart — the basal mid and apical slices. Image courtesy of European Heart Journal

MRI scan of heart damaged by COVID, which can cause myocarditis, infarction and/or ischemia. Blue means reduced blood flow, orange is good blood flow. In this figure the inferior part of the heart shows dark blue, so the myocardial blood flow is very reduced. The angiogram shows the coronary artery which supplies the blood to this part of the heart is occluded. The three colored MRI images show different slices of the heart — the basal mid and apical slices. Read more. Image courtesy of European Heart Journal

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 03, 2021
DAIC's sister radiology magazine Imaging Technology News (ITN) has created a photo gallery that shows a variety of...
American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) offers 5 Strategies for Improving Your Nuclear Cardiology Lab in 2021
Feature | Nuclear Imaging | June 02, 2021 | By Staff of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC)
A year after COVID-19 turned the world upside down, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) asked members how...
A view from our video analytics panel this past month, showing India as the biggest source of traffic and showing three of the top performing videos. Brightcove analytics.

A view from our video analytics panel this past month, showing India as the biggest source of traffic and showing three of the top performing videos.

Blog | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2021
Sometimes it takes a major shift is the world to see things differently. As editor of DAIC, I often wonder if the...
The WASE-COVID Study used the artificial intelligence automated echocardiogram reading software EchoGo-Core from Ultromics to evaluate ejection fraction and left ventricle longitudinal strain in COVID-19 patients to identify risk markers for mortality. The study also compared human vs. AI variability in assessing the exams. #ACC21 #ACC2021

The WASE-COVID Study used the artificial intelligence automated echocardiogram reading software EchoGo-Core from Ultromics to evaluate ejection fraction and left ventricle longitudinal strain in COVID-19 patients to identify risk markers for mortality. The study also compared human vs. AI variability in assessing the exams.

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 18, 2021
May 18, 2021 — Artificial intelligence (AI) derived heart measurements were able to predict COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2)...
Dapagliflozin did not significantly reduce organ failure or death in high-risk hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the DARE-19 trial results, presented at ACC.21. #ACC #ACC21 #ACC2021

Dapagliflozin did not significantly reduce organ failure or death in high-risk hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the DARE-19 trial results, presented at ACC.21.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 18, 2021
May 18, 2021 — Dapagliflozin (Farxiga), a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, did not significantly...
DAIC magazine won Overall Excellence Finalist/Multi-platform Package of the Year for its coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic’s Toll on Cardiology, National. The entry won an honor mention for its coverage of the COVID pandemic. Dave Fornell is the editor of DAIC.

Overall Excellence Finalist/Multi-platform Package of the Year for its coverage of the Pandemic’s Toll on Cardiology, National

Feature | Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology DAIC | May 17, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) and its sister publication Imaging Technology News (ITN) recently took...
According to the CDC, if you are fully vaccinated you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Infographic courtesy of the CDC.

According to the CDC, if you are fully vaccinated you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Infographic courtesy of the CDC.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 13, 2021
May 13, 2021 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released a new statement relaxing the...
Estimates of excess deaths, defined as the number of persons who have died from all causes, above the expected number of deaths for a given place and time, can provide a comprehensive account of mortality likely related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including deaths that are both directly and indirectly associated with COVID-19

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 13, 2021
May 13, 2021 — Estimates of excess deaths, defined as the number of persons who have died from all causes, above the...
The digital technology is reducing reliance on unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures and is cutting hospital waiting times
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 12, 2021
May 12, 2021 — HeartFlow, Inc., a leader in revolutionizing precision heartcare, today announced that the National...
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 may be at risk of developing heart failure even if they do not have a previous history of heart disease or cardiovascular risk factors, a new Mount Sinai study shows. 

Getty Images

News | Heart Failure | May 11, 2021
May 11, 2021 — Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 may be at risk of developing heart failure even if they do not have...
Videos | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 06, 2021
Payam Dehghani, M.D.,  FRCPC, FACC, FSCAI, co-director of Prairie Vascular Research and associate professor at the...