Videos | Vascular Closure Devices | October 17, 2019

VIDEO: Use of Large Bore Vascular Closure

Ashish Pershad, M.D., chief of interventional cardiology, Banner University Medical Center, Phoenix, explains the trend of using closure devices to seal larger vascular access sites from the use of TAVR, EVAR, TMVR and hemodynamic support devices at the 2019 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) meeting. He was one of the moderators on a session on this topic at TCT 2019.

 

Related Large Bore Vascular Closure Device Content:

VIDEO: How to Achieve Hemostasis With Large Bore Device Access — Interview with Philippe Genereux, M.D.

First-in-Human Results Show Early Bird Device Effective in Early Detection of Internal Bleeding

Advances and Trends in Vascular Closure Devices

Manta Large-Bore Vascular Closure Device Cleared by the FDA

PerQseal Large Bore Closure Device Launches in Europe

Teleflex Acquires Essential Medical

 


Related Content With Dr. Pershad:

National Coverage Determination Will Make TAVR Available to More Patients at More Centers

VIDEO: Comparison Between Watchman vs. Amulet LAA Occluders
 

Recent Videos View all 543 items

Remote Viewing Systems | August 19, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s zero footprint viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 13, 2020

This is a tutorial video on how to perform an artificial intelligence (AI) automated cardiac ejection fraction measurement using the GE Healthcare Vscan Extend point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system and the LVivo EF app, developed and licensed by DiA Imaging Analysis. This FDA-cleared app enables an automated edge detection of left ventricular endocardium and calculates end-diastolic, end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction, using apical 4-chamber view.

the LVivo EF app was showcased by GE Healthcare in its virtual booth at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2020 virtual meeting. POCUS imaging has emerged as a primary imaging modality for bedside assessment of COVID-19 patients in 2020.

 

Related ASE News and POCUS Content:

VIDEO: Automated Cardiac Ejection Fraction for Point-of-care-ultrasound Using Artificial Intelligence

LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction

GE Highlights New Echocardiography Technologies at ASE 2020

Other ASE news and video

 

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Artificial Intelligence | August 12, 2020

Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, MSCCT, explains how artificial intelligence (AI) might be used in the near future to automatically calculate CT calcium scoring and radiomic feature assessments. This was a key take away during the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2020 virtual meeting. 

Villines is the Julian Ruffin Beckwith Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Virginia, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular CT (JCCT),  and SCCT past-president.

AI is already commercially used to improve CT image reconstruction to increase the diagnostic quality of the images, especially from low-dose scans. AI is now being applied to automate time-consuming tasks in CT image reads, such as manually calculated calcium scores and automated contouring and quantification of anatomy and function of the heart.

Another area that is seeing a lot of research in in radiomics, where AI is being used to sift through thousands of CT scans to look for subtle imaging traits that may indicate the early development or worsening of disease. These subtle changes may not be evident to radiologists reading the scans, but AI software can identify similarities in patients as a trend and alert researchers to look at that specific trait as a potential imaging biomarker.

 

Other Key Trends and Technology at SCCT:

Top 9 Cardiovascular CT Studies in Past Year 

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography

VIDEO: Increased Use of Cardiac CT During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Key Cardiac CT Papers Presented at SCCT 2020

Low-attenuation Coronary Plaque Burden May Become Next Big Cardiac Risk Assessment

Impact of Cardiac CT During COVID-19

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence to Automate CT Calcium Scoring and Radiomics

 

Sponsored Videos View all 41 items

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Hemodynamic Support Devices | March 06, 2019

Perwaiz Meraj, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, director of interventional cardiology, assistant professor, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health System discusses the importance of hemodynamic support to safely perform a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with prior coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and comorbidities. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

In this video, Meraj discuss a complex coronary intervention of a 77-year-old woman with stage 4 CKD, prior CABG, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, who presented with angina and NSTEMI with an ejection fraction of 40 percent. The team at Northwell consulted with cardiac surgeons and the heart team, and determined that this patient was too high risk for another bypass surgery. Read more on this case.

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

 

Heart Failure | February 13, 2019

William O'Neill, M.D., highlights best practice protocols based on Impella Quality database and real-world evidence showing improved outcomes in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC

 

Related Impella Video Content:

VIDEO: Complex PCI Involving Prior CABG and Comorbidities — Interview with Perwaiz Meraj, M.D.

VIDEO: The Door-to-Unloading (DTU) STEMI Safety and Feasibility Trial — Interview with Navin Kapur, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support — Case study with Michael Amponsah, M.D.,

 

January 10, 2019

Mark Anderson, M.D., FACS, vice chair of cardiac surgery services and cardiothoracic surgeon at Hackensack University Medical Group, outlines a multi-disciplinary heart team approach in treament decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. Learn more at ProtectedPCI.com/DAIC.

Anderson discusses improving outcomes for patients in cardiogenic shock through the early use of mechanical circulatory support and the development of a shock protocol with the heart team. He outlines Hackensack University Medical Center’s multi-disciplinary, heart team approach in treatment decision-making for patients in cardiogenic shock. The team includes cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists, heart failure specialists and intensivists. 

 

 

Conference Coverage View all 406 items

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 13, 2020

This is a tutorial video on how to perform an artificial intelligence (AI) automated cardiac ejection fraction measurement using the GE Healthcare Vscan Extend point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system and the LVivo EF app, developed and licensed by DiA Imaging Analysis. This FDA-cleared app enables an automated edge detection of left ventricular endocardium and calculates end-diastolic, end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction, using apical 4-chamber view.

the LVivo EF app was showcased by GE Healthcare in its virtual booth at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2020 virtual meeting. POCUS imaging has emerged as a primary imaging modality for bedside assessment of COVID-19 patients in 2020.

 

Related ASE News and POCUS Content:

VIDEO: Automated Cardiac Ejection Fraction for Point-of-care-ultrasound Using Artificial Intelligence

LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction

GE Highlights New Echocardiography Technologies at ASE 2020

Other ASE news and video

 

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Artificial Intelligence | August 12, 2020

Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, MSCCT, explains how artificial intelligence (AI) might be used in the near future to automatically calculate CT calcium scoring and radiomic feature assessments. This was a key take away during the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2020 virtual meeting. 

Villines is the Julian Ruffin Beckwith Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Virginia, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular CT (JCCT),  and SCCT past-president.

AI is already commercially used to improve CT image reconstruction to increase the diagnostic quality of the images, especially from low-dose scans. AI is now being applied to automate time-consuming tasks in CT image reads, such as manually calculated calcium scores and automated contouring and quantification of anatomy and function of the heart.

Another area that is seeing a lot of research in in radiomics, where AI is being used to sift through thousands of CT scans to look for subtle imaging traits that may indicate the early development or worsening of disease. These subtle changes may not be evident to radiologists reading the scans, but AI software can identify similarities in patients as a trend and alert researchers to look at that specific trait as a potential imaging biomarker.

 

Other Key Trends and Technology at SCCT:

Top 9 Cardiovascular CT Studies in Past Year 

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography

VIDEO: Increased Use of Cardiac CT During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Key Cardiac CT Papers Presented at SCCT 2020

Low-attenuation Coronary Plaque Burden May Become Next Big Cardiac Risk Assessment

Impact of Cardiac CT During COVID-19

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence to Automate CT Calcium Scoring and Radiomics

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | August 11, 2020

Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, MSCCT, said photon counting CT detectors were a key new technology discussed at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2020 virtual meeting. He said the technology will likely replace conventional CT detectors in the next decade.

These new detectors also can take a single scan and bin the various energies to reconstruct a range of mono-energtic scan renderings similar to dual-energy CT, but on a wider spectrum of kV levels. This spectral aspect of photon counting also allows material decomposition based on the chemical elements that make up various materials in the scan, including calcium and metals that make up stents, orthopedic implants and replacement heart valves. This enables easier, automated removal of metal blooming artifacts and the ability to clearly image inside calcified arteries.

Villines is the Julian Ruffin Beckwith Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Virginia, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular CT (JCCT),  and SCCT past-president.

 

Other Key Trends and Technology at SCCT:

Top 9 Cardiovascular CT Studies in Past Year 

VIDEO: Increased Use of Cardiac CT During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Coronary Plaque Quantification Will Become Major Risk Assessment

VIDEO: Key Cardiac CT Papers Presented at SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence to Automate CT Calcium Scoring and Radiomics

Low-attenuation Coronary Plaque Burden May Become Next Big Cardiac Risk Assessment

Impact of Cardiac CT During COVID-19

 

Cath Lab View all 266 items

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

TCT | August 01, 2020

With COVID-19 forcing all medical conferences to go virtual in 2020, Juan F. Granada, M.D., CEO of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) explains how this year's Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2020 meeting is being structured and some of the advantages of the virtual format. He also shares how the virtual format was actually very helpful at CRF's Transcatheter Valve Therapeutics (TVT) Structural Heart Summit earlier this summer.

Virtual cardiology meetings so far in 2020 have found the format enables much more participation by international physicians than in the past. TCT is using this idea to focus sessions aimed at Asia and Europe at different parts that correspond to the end of the work day in those parts of the world. Granada said U.S. focused sessions will take place toward the end of the day across the United States to accommodate more attendees during the sessions, since many will be attending after they are finished for the day, rather than take days off to attend.

Virtual Cardiology Meetings During COVID-19 Allowing More International Attendance

VIDEO: Insights Into How HRS Organized its Virtual Meeting — a discussion with Krahn after the HRS 2020 virtual meeting on lessons learned.

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | July 24, 2020

Devi G. Nair, M.D., FHRS, director of cardiac electrophysiology, St. Bernards Heart and Vascular Center, Jonesboro, Ark., was an investigator in the PINNACLE FLX clinical trial for the Boston Scientific Watchman FLX left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder device. 

The newest iteration of the Watchman was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2020. Read more about the Watchman FLX 

The transcatheter implant is used in close the LAA, a pouch that forms part of the left atrium. The LAA is implicated in the formation of blood clots that cause stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The Watchman FLX is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF) who need an alternative to oral anticoagulation therapy by permanently closing off the left atrial appendage.

Nair is currently involved with another trial of the Watchman FLX, OPTION FLX trial, which is examining the use of LAA occlusion in post-ablation patients.

Nair is also chairman for the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) member engagement sub-committee and is a board member of the Arkansas chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).
 

Watch Nair in this interview — VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on Electrophysiology Programs

 

Cardiogenic Shock | July 15, 2020

Navin Kapur, M.D., FAHA, FACC, FSCAI, director, Acute Mechanical Circulatory Support Program and executive director of The Cardiovascular Center for Research and Innovation (CVCRI), Tufts Medical Center, explains the research being done by the Cardiogenic Shock Working Group, which is headed by Tufts. 

The Cardiogenic Shock Working Group (CSWG) has created a patient registry now includes 15-20 centers in the United States and data on more than 2,000 patients who suffered shock either from heart failure or acute myocardial infarction (MI). It also includes hemodynamic data on more than 1,100 patients. It also includes all types of mechanical circulatory support devices, from intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP),  incrementally higher levels with a percutaneous Impella pump, TandemHeart, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

Research last year showed three types of phenotype profiles in cardiogenic shock patients, including non-congested, cardio-renal and cardio-renal-hepatic. Kapur also said there is evidence that there is venous involvement that needs to be considered in future research.

The large amount of variables in the patient data from the CSWG is partly examined by artificial intelligence (AI), which helped identify the three shock phenotype profiles.

 

 

Related Cardiogenic Shock and Hemodyanmic Support Content:

VIDEO: Door-to-Unloading (DTU) Trial May Change STEMI Care

VIDEO: Tufts Uses a Hemodynamic Support Algorithm to Determine What Devices to Use

VIDEO: Hemodynamic Support Protocols at Henry Ford Hospital

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Initiative Continues to Reduce Mortality by 50 Percent

 

VIDEO: How to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality by 50 Percent

SCAI Releases New Consensus Document on Classification Stages of Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic Shock Survival Rates Improve in Three Years Since Impella FDA Approval

VIDEO: The Importance of Ventricular Unloading in AMI and Cardiogenic Shock

 

VIDEO: Escalation of Support and Algorithms for Cardiogenic Shock

10 Reasons Why it is Time to Learn More About Cardiogenic Shock

New Approaches to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality

 

Find more content on Tufts Medical Center 

 

Cardiac Imaging View all 258 items

Remote Viewing Systems | August 19, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s zero footprint viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 13, 2020

This is a tutorial video on how to perform an artificial intelligence (AI) automated cardiac ejection fraction measurement using the GE Healthcare Vscan Extend point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system and the LVivo EF app, developed and licensed by DiA Imaging Analysis. This FDA-cleared app enables an automated edge detection of left ventricular endocardium and calculates end-diastolic, end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction, using apical 4-chamber view.

the LVivo EF app was showcased by GE Healthcare in its virtual booth at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2020 virtual meeting. POCUS imaging has emerged as a primary imaging modality for bedside assessment of COVID-19 patients in 2020.

 

Related ASE News and POCUS Content:

VIDEO: Automated Cardiac Ejection Fraction for Point-of-care-ultrasound Using Artificial Intelligence

LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction

GE Highlights New Echocardiography Technologies at ASE 2020

Other ASE news and video

 

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Artificial Intelligence | August 12, 2020

Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, MSCCT, explains how artificial intelligence (AI) might be used in the near future to automatically calculate CT calcium scoring and radiomic feature assessments. This was a key take away during the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2020 virtual meeting. 

Villines is the Julian Ruffin Beckwith Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Virginia, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular CT (JCCT),  and SCCT past-president.

AI is already commercially used to improve CT image reconstruction to increase the diagnostic quality of the images, especially from low-dose scans. AI is now being applied to automate time-consuming tasks in CT image reads, such as manually calculated calcium scores and automated contouring and quantification of anatomy and function of the heart.

Another area that is seeing a lot of research in in radiomics, where AI is being used to sift through thousands of CT scans to look for subtle imaging traits that may indicate the early development or worsening of disease. These subtle changes may not be evident to radiologists reading the scans, but AI software can identify similarities in patients as a trend and alert researchers to look at that specific trait as a potential imaging biomarker.

 

Other Key Trends and Technology at SCCT:

Top 9 Cardiovascular CT Studies in Past Year 

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography

VIDEO: Increased Use of Cardiac CT During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Key Cardiac CT Papers Presented at SCCT 2020

Low-attenuation Coronary Plaque Burden May Become Next Big Cardiac Risk Assessment

Impact of Cardiac CT During COVID-19

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence to Automate CT Calcium Scoring and Radiomics

 

Cardiac Diagnostics View all 64 items

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020

Interview with Andrew D. Krahn, M.D.,FHRS, head of the division of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital, and professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia, and vice president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). He is an expert in long QT syndrome (LQTS) and is involved with the National Long QT Registry. He explains the issues with the drugs being used to treat coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) patients and why these combined with the cardiac impact of the virus is causing prolonged ECG QT segment prolongation, leading to deadly arrhythmias. COVID-19 can cause myocarditis that causes QT prolongation and the front-line COVID drugs hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin also cause QT prolongation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Drug Safety Communication April 23, 2020, reminding doctors there are serious side effects when using hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in the off-label use to treat COVID-19 patients. This includes potentially life-threatening heart rhythm problems. The FDA said case reports from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, published medical literature and the American Association of Poison Control Centers National Poison Data System are reporting serious heart-related adverse events and patient deaths. Read more about this alert.

The FDA warning confirmed fears from the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). These societies April 8 jointly published a new guidance, “Considerations for Drug Interactions on QTc in Exploratory COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 19) Treatment,” to detail critical cardiovascular considerations in the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19. The societies warned that use of  these agents in a large number of patients in combination would results in arrhythmias and deaths. Read more.

However, there are numerous advocates that argue hydroxychloroquine needs to be used in less sick patients who are not already hypoxic to treat COVID, but it is being used primarily in very sick patients where it is not effective. Advocates also argue the drug can be used to help prevent coronavirus, similar to the drug's effect in preventing malaria. In terms of drug safety, advocates argue the drug has been used in millions of patients for more than 50 years without a high risk of arrhythmias. Several trials are now underway in the United States to test its use against COVID-19, but enrollment has been hampered because of the FDA warning. There will likely be more interest in hydroxychloroquine after it was revealed May 18, 2020, that President Trump is taking the drug for prophylaxis against COVID-19.

 

Related Hydroxychloroquine Content:

FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

VIDEO: Overview of Hydroxychloroquine and FDA Warning in its use to Treat COVID-19 — Interview with Marianne Pop, Pharm.D.

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

COVID-19 Hydroxychloroquine Treatment Brings Prolonged QT Arrhythmia Issues

 

FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

VIDEO: Cardiologists Manage Trial Testing if Hydroxychloroquine Protects Clinicians From COVID-19 — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 22, 2020

Justin Fried, M.D., Attending cardiologist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York City, and assistant professor at at Columbia University and lead author on a report that explains the cardiovascular presentations of COVID-19. The study looked at four patient cases where cardiology became involved in the patient's care.

Novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) can present as a cardiovascular issue, or patients can develop myocarditis or cardiogenic shock as the virus progresses. SARS-CoV-2 has a much higher mortality rate in patients with comorbiditities, but is highest in patients with comorbidities like heart failure and coronary artery disease. Fried said these conditions are exacerbated by COVID-19.

"We tried to put together some of the observations we noted in our early experiences in these patients at out center with manifestations of COVID-19," explained Fried. "We are seeing significant cardiac involvement, but it is important to note that many of our patients with underlying cardiovascular disease, notably heart failure and coronary disease, are developing significant effects form COVID-19 that is destabilizing conditions, and that presents unique challenge. I worry most about our patients who have underlying cardiovascular disease, which can be exacerbated by COVID-19."

Read more details in the article "New York City Physicians Note Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19."

 

Other Impact of COVID-19 on Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging — Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.

Rapid Drop in Heart Attacks and Stroke at Hospitals Concerns ACC 

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — an interview with SCCT President Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

FFR Technologies | March 26, 2020

James Udelson, M.D., chief of the division of cardiology, Tufts Medical Center, explains how cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans are being used to create image-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) values to determine if a coronary lesion is flow limiting. The FFR-CT can help determine if the patient needs a stent, or if the disease can be treated with medication. Tufts uses FFR-CT evaluations on non-emergency chest pain patients to reduce the need for diagnostic catheterizations. 

 

Related FFR-CT Content:

Image-based FFR May Replace Pressure Wires and Adenosine

New Technology Directions in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR)

8 Cardiovascular Technologies to Watch in 2020

VIDEO: Using FFR-CT in Everyday Practice

FFR-CT is Ready for Prime-time Evaluation of Coronary Disease

6 Hot Topics in Interventional Cardiology at TCT 2019

FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?

 

Find more news and video from Tufts Medical Center

 

 

EP Lab View all 71 items

EP Lab | July 28, 2020

Devi G. Nair, M.D., FHRS, director of cardiac electrophysiology, St. Bernards Heart and Vascular Center, Jonesboro, Ark., explains the impact of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) on her EP program and what was done to continue operations and recover procedural volume. She also shares how EP played a role in the team approach to treating coronavirus patients at her center.

Her experience is an example of how centers have dealt with issues related to the pandemic, including shutting down elective procedures, treating emergent cases, reopening services, new safety precautions and how telehealth played a role.

Nair is also chairman for the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) member engagement sub-committee and is a board member of the Arkansas chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).

Watch Nair in this interview — VIDEO: Overview of LAA Occlusion Using the Watchman FLX

 

 

Related COVID-19 Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Why QT-prolongation Occurs in COVID-19 Patients on Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin — Interview with Andrew Krahn, M.D.

The Cardiovascular Impact of COVID-19

How Cardiology Dealt With the COVID-19 Surge in New York City

Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19 

 

VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Interventional Cardiology Program at Henry Ford Hospital — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

New Research Highlights Blood Clot Dangers of COVID-19

 

How to Manage AMI Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic 

Older Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients May Have Increased Risk of Bradycardia With Lopinavir and Ritonavir

VIDEO: Where Have all the STEMI Cases Gone Amid COVID-19? — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders | July 24, 2020

Devi G. Nair, M.D., FHRS, director of cardiac electrophysiology, St. Bernards Heart and Vascular Center, Jonesboro, Ark., was an investigator in the PINNACLE FLX clinical trial for the Boston Scientific Watchman FLX left atrial appendage (LAA) occluder device. 

The newest iteration of the Watchman was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2020. Read more about the Watchman FLX 

The transcatheter implant is used in close the LAA, a pouch that forms part of the left atrium. The LAA is implicated in the formation of blood clots that cause stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The Watchman FLX is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF) who need an alternative to oral anticoagulation therapy by permanently closing off the left atrial appendage.

Nair is currently involved with another trial of the Watchman FLX, OPTION FLX trial, which is examining the use of LAA occlusion in post-ablation patients.

Nair is also chairman for the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) member engagement sub-committee and is a board member of the Arkansas chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).
 

Watch Nair in this interview — VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on Electrophysiology Programs

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 29, 2020

Jay Mohan, D.O., RPVI, interventional cardiology fellow at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, created this video. It shows other clinicians how he set up his home COVID-19 decontamination area where he changes clothes, shoes and sterilizes before entering his house in order to protect his family. He has been involved with direct care of COVID-19 patients the past two months.

Since the start of the SAR-CoV-2 pandemic, clinicians and first-responders who are in contact with, or possible contact with, COVID-19 patients have developed ways to not bring and viral contamination home with them. This often includes on transition spot in the garage or designed room where they can change out of work clothing and shoes and into new clothing and shoes. Shoes and coats are separated into ones used for home and those dedicated for use at work only. Those who wear and reuse N95 masks also have developed ways to take the mask off by the straps only so they do not touch it and strapping it over a tupperware container that can then be sealed, or stored inside a disposable paper or plastic bag.

Mohan is board certified in cardiology, internal medicine, echocardiography and nuclear cardiology. He also serves as vice president of the Dr. Ramesh Kumar Foundation

Mohan shares regular updates on Twitter about recent cardiology technology devices, takeaway points from conferences and short educational videos he produces. Follow or contact him via Twitter or Instagram at @cardiologyoncall.

Watch a video animation he created — VIDEO: The Latest Data on COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease.
 

Find more cardiovascular related COVID-19 content

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020

Interview with Andrew D. Krahn, M.D.,FHRS, head of the division of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital, and professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia, and vice president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). He is an expert in long QT syndrome (LQTS) and is involved with the National Long QT Registry. He explains the issues with the drugs being used to treat coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) patients and why these combined with the cardiac impact of the virus is causing prolonged ECG QT segment prolongation, leading to deadly arrhythmias. COVID-19 can cause myocarditis that causes QT prolongation and the front-line COVID drugs hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin also cause QT prolongation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Drug Safety Communication April 23, 2020, reminding doctors there are serious side effects when using hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in the off-label use to treat COVID-19 patients. This includes potentially life-threatening heart rhythm problems. The FDA said case reports from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, published medical literature and the American Association of Poison Control Centers National Poison Data System are reporting serious heart-related adverse events and patient deaths. Read more about this alert.

The FDA warning confirmed fears from the American Heart Association (AHA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). These societies April 8 jointly published a new guidance, “Considerations for Drug Interactions on QTc in Exploratory COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 19) Treatment,” to detail critical cardiovascular considerations in the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19. The societies warned that use of  these agents in a large number of patients in combination would results in arrhythmias and deaths. Read more.

However, there are numerous advocates that argue hydroxychloroquine needs to be used in less sick patients who are not already hypoxic to treat COVID, but it is being used primarily in very sick patients where it is not effective. Advocates also argue the drug can be used to help prevent coronavirus, similar to the drug's effect in preventing malaria. In terms of drug safety, advocates argue the drug has been used in millions of patients for more than 50 years without a high risk of arrhythmias. Several trials are now underway in the United States to test its use against COVID-19, but enrollment has been hampered because of the FDA warning. There will likely be more interest in hydroxychloroquine after it was revealed May 18, 2020, that President Trump is taking the drug for prophylaxis against COVID-19.

 

Related Hydroxychloroquine Content:

FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

VIDEO: Overview of Hydroxychloroquine and FDA Warning in its use to Treat COVID-19 — Interview with Marianne Pop, Pharm.D.

WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

COVID-19 Hydroxychloroquine Treatment Brings Prolonged QT Arrhythmia Issues

 

FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

VIDEO: Cardiologists Manage Trial Testing if Hydroxychloroquine Protects Clinicians From COVID-19 — Interview with William O'Neill, M.D.

First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

Information Technology View all 153 items

Remote Viewing Systems | August 19, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s zero footprint viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint

Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 13, 2020

This is a tutorial video on how to perform an artificial intelligence (AI) automated cardiac ejection fraction measurement using the GE Healthcare Vscan Extend point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system and the LVivo EF app, developed and licensed by DiA Imaging Analysis. This FDA-cleared app enables an automated edge detection of left ventricular endocardium and calculates end-diastolic, end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction, using apical 4-chamber view.

the LVivo EF app was showcased by GE Healthcare in its virtual booth at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2020 virtual meeting. POCUS imaging has emerged as a primary imaging modality for bedside assessment of COVID-19 patients in 2020.

 

Related ASE News and POCUS Content:

VIDEO: Automated Cardiac Ejection Fraction for Point-of-care-ultrasound Using Artificial Intelligence

LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction

GE Highlights New Echocardiography Technologies at ASE 2020

Other ASE news and video

 

Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020

Advanced visualization company Medis recently purchased Advanced Medical Imaging Development S.r.l. (AMID), which developed software to automatically track and measure strain in echocardiograms. That technology is now being adapted for strain imaging in CT and MRI. Using this imaging data, the software also can noninvasively derive pressure gradient loops and curves, similar to using invasive pulmonary arterial (PA) hemodynamic pressure catheters. This information is useful in monitoring critically ill patients on hemodynamic support and to monitor worsening severity of heart failure. 

The technology was discussed at the 2020 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) virtual meeting. Examples of this technology are presented in this video. 
 

Find more news and video from SCCT 2020

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography
 

Artificial Intelligence | August 12, 2020

Todd Villines, M.D., FACC, FAHA, MSCCT, explains how artificial intelligence (AI) might be used in the near future to automatically calculate CT calcium scoring and radiomic feature assessments. This was a key take away during the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2020 virtual meeting. 

Villines is the Julian Ruffin Beckwith Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Virginia, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiovascular CT (JCCT),  and SCCT past-president.

AI is already commercially used to improve CT image reconstruction to increase the diagnostic quality of the images, especially from low-dose scans. AI is now being applied to automate time-consuming tasks in CT image reads, such as manually calculated calcium scores and automated contouring and quantification of anatomy and function of the heart.

Another area that is seeing a lot of research in in radiomics, where AI is being used to sift through thousands of CT scans to look for subtle imaging traits that may indicate the early development or worsening of disease. These subtle changes may not be evident to radiologists reading the scans, but AI software can identify similarities in patients as a trend and alert researchers to look at that specific trait as a potential imaging biomarker.

 

Other Key Trends and Technology at SCCT:

Top 9 Cardiovascular CT Studies in Past Year 

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography

VIDEO: Increased Use of Cardiac CT During the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Key Cardiac CT Papers Presented at SCCT 2020

Low-attenuation Coronary Plaque Burden May Become Next Big Cardiac Risk Assessment

Impact of Cardiac CT During COVID-19

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence to Automate CT Calcium Scoring and Radiomics