Feature | December 21, 2016| Dave Fornell

Most Popular Cardiology Articles of 2016 From DAIC

Absorb, bioresorbable stent, BVS, top cardiology story of 2016

The FDA clearance of the first fully bioresorbable stent, the Abbott Absorb BVS, was by far the top story of 2016. Readers clearly had a massive interest in this technology based on their page views of this article, related bioresorbable stent content and a video interviews with key ABSORB study investigators.

The Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) website had a record year in 2016, breaking 1 million page views for the first time. Here are the most popular pieces of content from 2016, based on page views from website analytics. A second list at the bottom offers the most popular archive content from DAIV, which was added to the website prior to 2016.

1. FDA Approves First Totally Bioresorbable Stent

2. 5 Technologies to Reduce Cath Lab Radiation Exposure

3. 5 New Implantable Cardiovascular Technologies to Watch

4. Embryonic Heart Valve Research May Prevent Newborn Congenital Heart Defects

5. FDA OKs TAVR Trial for Low-Risk Patients Using Sapien 3 Device

6. FDA Expands Sapien TAVR Valve Indication to Intermediate-Risk Patients

7. Requirements for Interventional Echocardiographers

8. Study Shows New Brain Lesions in 94 Percent of Patients Following TAVR

9. St. Jude Medical Recalls ICDs and CRT-D Due to Premature Battery Depletion

10. Independent Study Finds Biodegradable Polymer Stents Provide No Clinical Benefit Over Resolute Integrity DES

11. VIDEO: TAVR Beats Surgery — Top News From ACC.16

12. A Possible Replacement For X-ray Angiography in the Cath Lab

13. First TAVR Device Receives European Approval to Treat Intermediate Risk Patients

14. 10 Reasons Why You Need Supplemental Imaging in the Cath Lab

15. Understanding the Design and Function of Guidewire Technology

16.  Update for LAA Occluder Technology News and Trends

17. The Latest in Ultrasound Technology

18. Study Finds Strain Echo Good Evaluator for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Risk Assessment

19. Improving Efficiencies With a Radial Access Sleeve Drape

20. Questions Remain on Future of Bioresorbable Stents

21. Abbott Issues Voluntary Safety Notice on MitraClip Delivery System Deployment Process

22. Updated ASE Guideline Simplifies Evaluation of Possible Heart Failure

23. St. Jude Medical, Abbott to Sell Portion of Vascular Closure, EP Businesses to Terumo

24. Study Shows Zip Skin Closure System Saves Time in the Cath Lab

25. New Study Demonstrates Cost-Effectiveness of Watchman Device

26. FDA Clears Lithoplasty Balloon That Shatters Calcified Lesions With Ultrasound

27. Preparing Hospitals for Mandatory Medicare Cardiac Bundled Payments

28. Role of Imaging in Bioresorbable Stent Procedures

29. Michigan Hospital Employing Conscious Sedation for Aortic Aneurysm Repair

30. VIDEO: Poor Outcomes for Bioresorbable Stents in Small Coronary Arteries

 

Watch the Top Cardiology Videos on DAIC in 2016

 

Top DAIC Archive Content of 2016

This is a list of the most popular archive content on DAIC that is from years prior to 2016.

1. Costs vs. Benefits: Comparing 64-Slice to 256, 320-Slice CT

2. SPECT vs. PET, Which is Best?

3. Closing Holes in the Heart

4. FFR and iFR in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Disease  

5. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Devices in Development

6. The Basics of Guide Wire Technology

7. FDA Reports Serious Erosion Events With Amplatzer Septal Occluder

8. Bioresorbable Stents Are the Way of the Future

9. Patient Satisfaction and Complications of Transradial Catheterization

10. Comparing CTA and MRA

11. Transradial Access Staff Training and Patient Discharge

12. Ultrasound-assisted Catheter-directed Thrombolysis Reduces Treatment Risks for Pulmonary Emboli

13. The Advantages and Disadvantages of OCT vs. IVUS

14. ICD Manufacturers Must Increase Battery Life to Cut Costs, Improve Care

15. CRT-D Therapy Improves Long-term Survival in Heart Failure Patients Over ICD

16. Advances in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Technology

17. Dissolving Stents May Offer New Options in the Next Decade

18. Heart Surgeon Shares Effects of Fluoroscopic Radiation Exposure in ORSIF Documentary

19. Toshiba Releases 640-Slice CT Scanner

20. The Cath Lab of the Future

21. FDA Clears GE’s Revolution CT 256-Slice Scanner

22. FDA Clears Medtronic’s Drug-eluting Balloon for Peripheral Artery Disease

23. DES vs. BMS - Which Are Best?

24. Hemodynamic Systems Improve Cath Lab Workflow, Efficiency

25. Technical Factors Involved in False Positive ECG STEMI Diagnoses

 

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