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VIDEO: The Current State of Bioresorbable Stents in 2018

Stents Bioresorbable | August 06, 2018

Patrick Serruys, M.D., Ph.D., Imperial College London, explains where development of bioresorbable scaffolds stands in 2018. He spoke to DAIC at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2018 meeting. 

Watch the related VIDEO What Went Wrong With the Absorb Stent?

Read the related article Current State of Bioresorbable Stent Technology

Read the related article Amaranth Unveils 85-micron Bioresorbable Stent

 

Conference Videos

Cardiac Imaging | December 30, 2011

DAIC editor Dave Fornell explains some of the most innovative cardiovascular imaging technologies showcased by vendors at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting in December 2011.

Cardiac PACS | December 21, 2011

At RSNA 2011, McKesson shared case studies about its CVIS end-users, who are enjoying new features that increase efficiencies and save time.

Ultrasound Imaging | December 16, 2011

At RSNA 2011, Toshiba unveiled its Aplio 500 ultrasound system, which offers a unique 3-D fly-through imaging capability. The system takes the image dataset and processes it to create a cine loop fly-through of any hollow, fluid-filled blood vessel, duct or organ. The example in this video is of a blood vessel in the liver. The capability and image quality is similar to what is seen in a virtual colonoscopy created from CT datasets. The technology was highlighted in our editor's choice for most innovative new technologies at RSNA 2011. The future applications of this technology may include 3-D ultrasound navigation aids for vessels in the cath lab.

PET-MRI | June 27, 2011

Three companies showed different versions of a combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) system during the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2011 annual meeting in San Antonio, Texas. Representatives from Siemens, Philips and GE Healthcare explain how their systems work and how PET/MR may be used as a new modality to show both physiologic and anatomical information.

Nuclear Imaging | June 27, 2011

Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) President George Segall, M.D., offers insights into the trends he saw at the society's 2011 annual meeting, including PET/MRI and amyloid plaque imaging.

Mobile Devices | June 27, 2011

MIM Software offers remote viewing software to call up diagnostic-quality medical images on an iPad, iPhone and other smart phones. The software, images and computing power are hosted on a cloud-based server, which can be accessed with these devices from any location. MIM Chief Technology Officer Mark Cain demonstrates the system during the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2011 annual meeting.

Cardiac PACS | April 28, 2011

Horizon Cardiology provides solutions to some of the challenges encountered by clinicians today, particularly to improve workflow. It provides improved interfacing, eliminates redundancies and gives clinicians the information they need to perform at maximum efficiency. Other improvements to workflow efficiencies include the charge manager, as well as improving the flow of information from the cath lab. McKesson also has been experimenting with development of an interface for the iPad. For more information: www.AllAboutCVIS.com

Radial Access | April 28, 2011

In the largest randomized trial to compare radial access and femoral access for coronary angiography and intervention, researchers found radial access reduced rates of vascular complications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2011 Scientific Session in New Orleans. The trial also found that radial access did not reduce the primary outcome measure of death, heart attack, stroke and non-CABG-related major bleeding compared to femoral access in the overall study population. The data showed these outcomes were equal for both femoral and radial access procedures.

"Interventional cardiologists can feel reassured both radial and femoral approaches are safe and effective," said Sanjit Jolly, M.D., M.Sc., assistant professor of medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Radial access did lead to reductions in the primary outcome measure in patients who underwent the procedure at hospitals that conducted a high volume of radial procedures. For centers that were less experienced with radial access, Jolly said it was clear there is a learning curve, and operators got better and faster with radial procedures with more experience. "The take-home message is practice makes perfect," he said. Jolly explained the high-volume centers using radial access performed very well, but it was clear from the study operators need a lot of radial cases to increase performance. To read more, visit www.dicardiology.net/article/rival-trial-radial-access-reduces-vascular-complications

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